Chess game – Echecs Faciles http://echecs-faciles.com/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 17:24:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://echecs-faciles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-80x80.png Chess game – Echecs Faciles http://echecs-faciles.com/ 32 32 India ‘A’ beat Kazakhstan in women’s https://echecs-faciles.com/india-a-beat-kazakhstan-in-womens/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 17:24:45 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/india-a-beat-kazakhstan-in-womens/ Mamallapuram: India’s top-seeded “A” team outclassed Kazakhstan 3.5-0.5 for a crucial victory in the 10th and penultimate round of the women’s section of the 44th Chess Olympiad here Monday. Top player Koneru Humpy returned to victory beating Zhansaya Abdumalik while Tania Sachdev and Bhakti Kulkarni scored against Xeniya Balabayeva and Gulikshan Nakhbayeva respectively. R Vaishali […]]]>

Mamallapuram: India’s top-seeded “A” team outclassed Kazakhstan 3.5-0.5 for a crucial victory in the 10th and penultimate round of the women’s section of the 44th Chess Olympiad here Monday.

Top player Koneru Humpy returned to victory beating Zhansaya Abdumalik while Tania Sachdev and Bhakti Kulkarni scored against Xeniya Balabayeva and Gulikshan Nakhbayeva respectively. R Vaishali drew with Bibisara Assaubayeva on the second board.

In the Open section, India’s in-form “B” team had to settle for a 2-2 draw with Uzbekistan as in-form D Gukesh lost to Nodirbek Abdusattorov , the reigning world champion in rapid chess.

Teenage GM Gukesh, who scored 8.5 points in nine rounds heading into Monday’s game, faltered against compatriot Abdusattorov in a 72-hit match.

Gukesh’s talented compatriot R Praggnanandhaa beat Javokhir Sindarov after Nihal Sarin and B Adhiban drew against Nodirbek Yakubboev and Jakhongir Vakhidov.

India’s second-seeded ‘A’ team overcame a top-shelf P Harikrishna loss to Param Maghsoodloo to beat Iran 2.5-1.5 and improve their chances of a podium finish.

India’s ‘C’ team (16th seed) were held to a 2-2 draw by 34th-seeded Slovakia.

Armenia, who were top after the eighth round, came back strong to join Uzbekistan again after a 3-1 demolition of Azerbaijan. Armenia and Uzbekistan have racked up 17 match points with one round to go.

India ‘A’ has 16 match points. The number one seed USA came back strong with a convincing 3-1 loss to Turkey and joined India ‘A’ with 16 points.

Important results

Open: India “B” drew with Uzbekistan 2-2 (D Gukesh lost to Nodirbek Abdusattorov, Nihal Sarin drew with Nodirbek Yakkubboev, R Praggnanandhaa beat Javokhir Sindarov, B Adhiban drew with J Vakhidov).

India “A” beat Iran 2.5-1.5 (P Harikrishna lost to Param Maghsoodloo, Vidit S Gujrathi beat M Amin Tabatabeai, Arjun Erigaisi drew with Pouya Idani, SL Narayan beat Bardiya Daneshvar).

India “C” beat Slovakia 2-2 (SS Ganguly drew with Jergus Pechac, SP Sethuraman lost to Viktor Gazik, Karthikeyan Murali drew with Juraj Druska, Abhimanyu Puranik beat Christopher Repka).

Azerbaijan lost to Armenia 1-3, USA beat Turkey 3-1, Serbia drew with Netherlands 2-2, Spain beat Czech Republic 2, 5-1.5, Hungary drew Ukraine 2-2, Germany beat Israel 3-1, England beat Italy 3-1, France drew Lithuania 2-2.

Women: India “A” beat Kazakhstan 3.5-0.5 (Koneru Humpy beat Zhansaya Abdumalik, R Vaishali drew with Bibisara Assaubayeva, Tania Sachdev beat Xeniya Balabayeva, Bhakti Kulkarni beat Gulikshan Nakhbayeva ),

India “B” beat Netherlands 3-1 (Vantika Agrawal lost to Zhaoqin Peng, Padmini Rout beat Machteld van Foreest, Mary Ann Gomes beat Rosa Ratsma, Divya Deshmukh beat Tea Lachava).

India “C” beat Sweden 3-1 (Easha Karavade drew with Pia Cramling, PV Nandhidhaa beat Inna Agrest, Varshini Sahiti drew with Bel Cramling, Pratyusha Bodda beat Viktoria Johansson).

Georgia drew with Poland 2-2, Germany lost with Ukraine 1.5-2.5, Armenia lost with Azerbaijan 0-4, USA beat the Indonesia 3-1, Cuba lost to Slovakia 1.5-2.5, Mongolia drew Bulgaria 2-2, Hungary beat Italy 3.5-0.5.

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Boris Spassky crushes Fischer’s Najdorf https://echecs-faciles.com/boris-spassky-crushes-fischers-najdorf/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/boris-spassky-crushes-fischers-najdorf/ When we last left the 1972 World Chess Championship, GM Bobby Fischer had just won game six in brilliant fashion to take the lead. By Game 11, the situation was only deteriorating further for defending champion GM Boris Spassky, and his back was against the wall. Spassky had also lost his next two games with […]]]>

When we last left the 1972 World Chess Championship, GM Bobby Fischer had just won game six in brilliant fashion to take the lead. By Game 11, the situation was only deteriorating further for defending champion GM Boris Spassky, and his back was against the wall. Spassky had also lost his next two games with Black and could only draw two games with White. As a result, Fischer now led 6.5-3.5 (five wins to two with three draws).

In other words, Spassky’s margin had gone from plus-2 to minus-3 in only a third of the scheduled games – from game three through game ten, Spassky had lost. five times and only held three draws. The reigning world champion desperately needed a reprieve.

It seemed unlikely when Fischer went to one of his strongest openings in Game 11 of the match, the poison pawn variation of the Najdorf variation of the Sicilian defense. Just as Fischer had never defeated Spassky before 1972, he had never lost to an opponent with this opening variation.

Boris Spassky won three games during the game and each of them was weird in its own way. The first game was decided after two blunders by Fischer in a tied final. The second game was gifted – the challenger refused to play. As for Game 11, it’s a mix of both things: mistakes and the feeling that the real Fischer didn’t show up for the duel. This happened for a reason – the dreaded Soviet team prepared a new move in one of the most critical lines of Najdorf’s defense. After being caught opener, Fischer felt the pressure. This explains why he only played the Najdorf once more in the remaining games of the match and avoided the poison pawn variation when he did.

Now Fischer had lost a game of Poisoned Pawn. And after that match, he only played 40 more serious matches in total, all of them against Spassky. In none of them did he play the same line, apparently convinced even in their match 20 years later that Spassky would have the advantage.

Spassky was officially credited with three wins in this championship game. In the first game, Fischer played the dubious 29…Bxh2 and lost in 56 moves. In game two, Fischer didn’t even show up. In the historical interpretation of the game, these two games received an asterisk, especially the second one, for obvious reasons. But this contest was purely Spassky at his best.

It was the first, and ultimately only game of the match that Spassky won more than Fischer had lost. According to Computer Chess.com at its deepest level of analysis, Spassky played with an overall accuracy of 99.4% and not as much as a single inaccurate move.

World Chess Championship 1972 Fischer Spassky 50th Chess.com
Even against Fischer’s suboptimal defense, Spassky never slipped.

As older chess players, Queen’s Gambit as fans and readers of this series of articles know, major chess events used to adjourn games after 40 moves to be completed the next day (until the advent of chess supercomputers makes this practice obsolete). Game 11 didn’t need a postponement, Spassky had won so much.

The game was a strong reminder that Spassky wasn’t just Fischer fodder. This player was the world champion! It’s too easy to think of Spassky as “the guy who lost in 1972” and not as one of the best players in history, someone who could win at any position.

Spassky was not just fodder for Fischer. This player was the world champion!

That doesn’t help, as Fischer won by four points despite those two weird losses at the start, 1972 was still considered a rout. And fair enough.

But after 11 games, Spassky is down just two points with 13 games still on the schedule. And as the defending champion, he would only have to tie the game to remain champion.

Although things away from the board had calmed down in relation to the build-up to the game and the first two games, Fischer was still responsible for a random meltdown, and no one could tell how he would react if the game got much closer. (In fact, there was a little-known near-disaster for the 17th game of the match, when Fischer was coasting in the actual games.)

In the 12th game that immediately followed, Spassky finally got another draw with the black pieces. It was his first draw with Black since the fourth game of the match. This Cold War proxy battle was not quite over yet.

Game 13 was another story for another time (but soon!).


Previous articles on the 50th anniversary of Fischer-Spassky:

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In troubled Sri Lanka, chess dreams threaten to turn to ashes https://echecs-faciles.com/in-troubled-sri-lanka-chess-dreams-threaten-to-turn-to-ashes/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 02:09:25 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/in-troubled-sri-lanka-chess-dreams-threaten-to-turn-to-ashes/ Just days before Colombo began to burn, Sri Lanka’s top-ranked chess player, Isuru Alahakoon, decided to flee the capital to his hometown of Kandy. A Navy officer, his intelligence sources had warned him of an impending crisis, and he immediately requested leave. “The situation was already bad, but before it got worse, I decided to […]]]>

Just days before Colombo began to burn, Sri Lanka’s top-ranked chess player, Isuru Alahakoon, decided to flee the capital to his hometown of Kandy. A Navy officer, his intelligence sources had warned him of an impending crisis, and he immediately requested leave. “The situation was already bad, but before it got worse, I decided to go home on leave and asked senior officials for leave,” he says.

There was uncertainty. The latent conflicts were such that he did not know if he would lose his job on his return. The unpredictability was such that he didn’t know if he would reach his hometown unscathed. The chaos was such that he did not know if his house in Colombo would be ransacked. But he knew one thing. “If I stayed in Colombo, I wouldn’t be able to focus on chess and my preparations for the Olympiad would fall apart. I had worked so hard over the past few months thinking about the Olympiad,” he said.

The road from Colombo to Kandy was risky. “I can’t ride a bike, it was too risky and I didn’t know if I had enough fuel. I could not travel by bus, as public transport did not travel long distances. Finally, a couple of my friends organized a car lift with people going to Kandy,” he says.

The three and a half hours were strenuous but a trip he says he will never forget in his life. It was a trip that made her feel life closer than ever. “You could see hundreds of protesters in the streets, people who lost their livelihoods, people who had no food or money. You could see long lines in front of the ration stores and of course, in front of the gas pumps. I felt grateful that I didn’t at least go through all of that,” he says.

The backdrop was relatively peaceful at home. At least when he looked out his window he could see the hills and the greenery and not the smoke and the fire. But the stories of his Colombo teammates would upset him. He couldn’t pretend to be strange to what was going on around him. “It was hard for them to concentrate with all these things going on around them. There were frequent power cuts which meant we couldn’t meet online and play games. Real meetings were difficult as we all lived in remote places and traveling was a real headache. Power cuts also meant the internet went down and they couldn’t play online games,” says- he.

With the general inflation, data also became expensive and they would save everything for failures. No random browsing or wasted data. Isuru wouldn’t even broadcast cricket matches – he was an aspiring cricketer and switched to chess in school out of frustration at not being picked into the team.

But amid their larger concerns, failures took a back seat. Ranindu Dilshan Liyanage, who had recently crushed India’s chief executive D Gukesh and is considered the brightest young star on the Lankan horizon, had spent countless hours in the scorching sun buying fuel or vegetables. “After a while, I got used to it. Obviously it was difficult, but one thing that chess taught me was survival. You can only be a winner if you go through trials. This crisis has made us all tougher and I hope that will be reflected in our games as well. The Olympiad was a motivation for us, something we could all look forward to,” he says.

Isuru then ran into another problem. He had to return to Colombo for a visa appointment at the Indian Embassy. Again, friends helped him reach the capital in time. At that time, Colombo seemed like a different city, a place of his nightmares. “There were troubles, there were tears. The scenes were heartbreaking,” he says.

The sights and sounds made him fear for the future of chess and for himself in the country. “As such, it is difficult to get sponsors. Now that would be even more difficult. There would be fewer tournaments in the country and we would have no money to travel abroad for tournaments, which means it would be difficult to accumulate points and meet the standards,” says Isuru. , whose dreams of completing IM standards have been blocked.

Gradually, he fears, the situation would degenerate into an existential crisis. “After one point, I don’t know how we’re going to survive. Maybe we would have to leave the country. For me it’s relatively good, I’ve been playing for a while and I have a job. But what about young people? Would they be encouraged to play sports? I doubt it,” he asks.

Or those young people who have adopted the sport but would have to abandon it in the race to find a livelihood. Like Ranindu, who aspires to be his country’s first grandmaster and has now amassed 2200 ELO points. Isuru becomes a philosopher: “There would be light at the end of the tunnel.” But later admits he’s not too hopeful of seeing those bright days anytime soon.

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India 2, Armenia Lead Open; India, Georgia, Romania Women in the lead https://echecs-faciles.com/india-2-armenia-lead-open-india-georgia-romania-women-in-the-lead/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 09:35:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/india-2-armenia-lead-open-india-georgia-romania-women-in-the-lead/ 11th-seeded India 2 picked up an upset victory over fourth-seeded Spain, while 12th-seeded Armenia beat 10th-seeded England, both with an identical score of 2.5-1.5, to jointly lead the open section with 10 match points at the end of the fifth round of the 44th FIDE Chess Olympiad. Young GM Dommaraju Gukesh defeated legendary GM Alexei […]]]>

11th-seeded India 2 picked up an upset victory over fourth-seeded Spain, while 12th-seeded Armenia beat 10th-seeded England, both with an identical score of 2.5-1.5, to jointly lead the open section with 10 match points at the end of the fifth round of the 44th FIDE Chess Olympiad. Young GM Dommaraju Gukesh defeated legendary GM Alexei Shirov on the top board of India 2 which will be covered as the standout game of the day.

In other upsets of the day, 32nd-seeded Cuba shocked sixth-seeded Azerbaijan while the Philippines prevailed over Sweden, both with an identical score of 2.5-1 .5 again. Uzbekistan, Cuba, India, Iran and the United States follow the leaders with nine match points.

India prevailed over France with a score of 2.5-1.5, Georgia beat India 2 with 3-1 and 20th-seeded Romania beat fourth-seeded Poland series, with 2.5-1.5 to become the leaders of the 44th FIDE Women’s Chess Olympiad. Azerbaijan held Ukraine to a 2-2 draw, joined in second place by Kazakhstan, who beat Cuba 3-1, all on nine match points.

USA’s MI Carissa Yip (2416) was beaten by WFM Paula Elizab Paredes Bustamante (2162) with the black pieces in 31st-seeded Peru’s surprise victory over the seventh-seeded USA with a score 2.5-1.5, while Colombia held Spain to a 2-2 draw. The United States now remain tied for places 29-74 with six match points.

Personalities of the Olympiad

The gaming arena is not only filled with professional chess players and grandmasters. It also consists of a large number of chess enthusiasts, budding young players and visitors for whom the event is a biannual spectacle. Without forgetting the referees, officials and other contributors. It is an event where you visit a new place in any part of the globe different from your own, enjoy the hospitality, the cuisine, rekindle old friendships and create new ones. Dress, speak and express yourself as is customary in your own culture. But the time comes, the chessboard remains a serious place where you give the maximum, at your modest level.

In uniform, IM Paula Andrea Rodriguez Rueda from Colombia is also an army officer. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Davaakhuu Munkhzul from Mongolia. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

People from different cultures express their happiness in different ways. To be right here at the Olympiad. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Team of Indonesian women, in colorful outfits. Photo: Lennart Ootes/FIDE.

Joseph Dalliah from Gambia, in a friendly hat. Photo: Mark Livshitz/FIDE.

Oman women’s team. Photo: Mark Livshitz/FIDE.

Stev Bonhage the photographer, at work. Photo: Lennart Ootes/FIDE.

Klean Shuqja from Albania. Photo: Mark Livshitz/FIDE.

Open section

As mentioned yesterday, India 2 remains the crowd favorite, and they also justify the expectations today. Discussing the young team on Chess.com’s live commentary, GM Arturs Neiksans boldly stated: “[I am] not really sure if india 1 is really stronger than india 2 because [India 2] are such an impressive range. I would like the young people to succeed!” GM Yasser Seirawan haughtily declared: “The future belongs to them!”

The future is here: India 2 team for the 5th round (LR) Praggnanandhaa, Adhiban, Gukesh and Nihal. Photo: Stev Bonhage/FIDE.

The future belongs to them!
—GM Yasser Seirawan

While three of India’s main team players (GMs Pentala Harikrishna, Vidit Gujrathi and Erigasi Arjun) are rated higher than the other India 2 team members, Gukesh, GM Nihal Sarin and GM Rameshbabu Praggnanandhaa have made gains of Considerable scoring since the teams were announced, selected based on average player ratings between the scoring lists from March to May 2022 – the criteria on which Indian teams are typically selected to represent the country. The average age of the Indian main team is around 29 years old while that of the Indian team 2 is 19 years old.

India 2 was helped by Gukesh’s smooth victory over Shirov, which is annotated as the game of the day:

game of the day

Speaking to the press later, Gukesh confessed that 19…b5 was the pivotal moment of the game’s provocation, while he was sure Shirov was likely to take the bait and attempt d3-d4 later, which he saw fit for The Black. The victory also allowed Gukesh to maintain a clear score of 5/5 so far in the tournament, a feat he shares with another young prodigy: GM Nodirbek Abdusattorov of Uzbekistan.

GM Baskaran Adhiban took advantage of an error on GM Eduardo Iturrizaga Bonelli’s 38th move.

Armenia joined India 2 in the lead, mainly thanks to the only decisive game of their game against England, when GM Hrant Melkumyan took advantage of a tactical error by GM Luke McShane:

LR: Melkumyan, Sargissian, McShane and Adams. Photo: Maria Emelianova.

Cuba’s victory over Azerbaijan was marked by a match beautifully led by GM Carlos Daniel Albornoz Cabrera:

American GM Leinier Dominguez scored a crucial victory by beating Israeli GM Maxim Rodshtein with a fine exchange sacrifice. This victory allowed the United States to beat Israel 2.5-1.5, with all other boards ending in draws:

The encounter had a dramatic moment, as Dominguez’ clock stopped at the 40th move with just seconds to go. Seirawan and Neiksans were visibly nervous at the Chess.com comment and started a countdown of seconds remaining with 6-5-4-3-2—at which point Dominguez thought calmly and played 40.Qxa4 with only two seconds to play. the clock! Seirawan later exclaimed, “Those two seconds were killers!”

Dominguez (with Wesley So to his left) – dealing with the killer for two seconds. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

See the full results here.

Women’s section

After the first two tables ended their matches with draws, India prevailed over France thanks to IM Tania Sachdev, who turned out to be the crucial points scorer for the team, just like she did in the previous round:

Tania Sachdev, a determined interpreter for her team. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

India’s margin of victory could have been bigger had IM Vaishali R converted a clear advantage into victory:

The architect of the Romanian victory was WGM Mihaela Sandu, who played a fine attacking game to claim an upset victory over the much higher rated GM Monica Socko of Poland, a crucial victory for her team:

WGM Mihaela Sandu, scoring a crucial victory for Romania. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Georgia scored 3-1 against India 3 in a seemingly one-sided game, where IM Lela Javakhishvili and IM Meri Arabidze prevailed over IM Soumya Swaminathan and WGM Divya Deshmukh respectively.

See the full results here.

The 44th FIDE Chess Olympiad and Women’s Chess Olympiad are team events where national chess federations compete in classic games for gold medals, trophies and the nation title of strongest chess in the world. The event consists of an 11-round Swiss tournament where each player from one national team plays against another player from the opposing national team. Teams receive “game points” for winning or drawing and “match points” for winning or drawing. The teams with the most match points for each section become their section’s champions, with a third prize for the team with the most points from both sections combined.


Previous cover:

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The future of chess is in India: Aronian https://echecs-faciles.com/the-future-of-chess-is-in-india-aronian/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 17:50:05 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/the-future-of-chess-is-in-india-aronian/ So far, it has been difficult to decipher the Chess Olympiad campaign in the United States. They won each of their first three rounds before a draw against Uzbekistan on Monday, with the assurance of a top-seeded side presented as overwhelming favorites in the clear absence. Levon Aronian, Fabiano Caruana, Wesley So, Leinier Dominguez and […]]]>

So far, it has been difficult to decipher the Chess Olympiad campaign in the United States. They won each of their first three rounds before a draw against Uzbekistan on Monday, with the assurance of a top-seeded side presented as overwhelming favorites in the clear absence. Levon Aronian, Fabiano Caruana, Wesley So, Leinier Dominguez and Sam Shankland all had their moments of indifference, and their wins required one of them to dig deep and bail them out.

“So far we are slowly getting back into shape,” said world number 6 Aronian, held by Uzbekistan’s Nodirbek Yakubboev on Monday. “It’s normal to be a bit relaxed when you’re a big favourite. We’ve had a few wake-up calls. We’re more or less ready to fight now.

Read also | India’s top team held by France, Mongolia hold Carlsen’s Norway

Aronian seems to agree that India’s top two teams in the open section are well placed to claim medals. “There is no guarantee that we are going to roll the event even though we have such strong players. Because everyone is fighting. It only takes one bad game for things to turn completely around. Teams India are very strong with so many talented players. The majority of people in the chess world know that the future of chess is in India,” he said.

The 39-year-old has been on the chess circuit for over two decades now, witnessing the evolution of the game up close. In its early days, the involvement of technology in chess was expected to be minimal.

“The dynamic has changed,” he explained, “With the help of computers, players are getting much stronger much earlier. I was very proud when I became a grandmaster at the age of 17. Nowadays, it’s not really a great achievement.

While this is a clear advantage of the growing role of technology, there are also disadvantages. According to Aronian, this hampers the freedom to experiment and find your own way as a chess player.

“Of course the engines have been a complete game-changer. I can’t say for the best. But it’s a game that we love and are ready to play. We’re always trying to find openings that give us strength. space to be creative. The problem is that some openings have become unplayable because of the computers. You can only shoot those openings, so you can never fight for a win. For me, personally, I like to try to ‘to be creative in the openings. These days it’s not possible anymore,’ he said.

The young Indians – D Gukesh, R Praggnanandhaa and Nihal Sarin in particular – have been named as future top 10 players by many chess world luminaries. Aronian also offered them some words of wisdom.

“The peak is much earlier these days. Some players peak at 16. What is needed is a love of the game, character and diligent work. Generally, players who pay attention to their tactical vision and study their classics are better than the others. That’s normally the trick to reaching the highest level,” he said.

‘Carlsen shouldn’t undermine the world championship title’

In response to Magnus Carlsen’s decision not to defend his World Championship title next year, Aronian said: “I think the format is good. I feel like Magnus is just tired. It’s normal. Although there are no injuries in chess, you can be completely tired. He just wants to release the pressure and play. If he is honest and respects the players who become world champions, I see it as a positive thing. If he’s going to undermine the world championship title, that would be bad for the chess world.”

How does Aronian ensure he stays fresh and motivated for the challenges ahead? “I remind myself every day that I’m not a very good player. So I’m working on it, ”he replied without the slightest trace of self-mockery. “In the first round here, my opponent played much better than me despite having a lower score. It’s a very big motivation. »

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Queen’s gambit: Chess Olympiad picks up some dance moves in Tamil Nadu https://echecs-faciles.com/queens-gambit-chess-olympiad-picks-up-some-dance-moves-in-tamil-nadu/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 00:50:45 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/queens-gambit-chess-olympiad-picks-up-some-dance-moves-in-tamil-nadu/ HAVING showcased the state’s Dravidian heritage at the impressive inaugural ceremony of the 44th Chess Olympiad on Thursday, the government of Tamil Nadu did better. Chief Minister MK Stalin has posted a video “Chess Dance” where the black queen triumphs over the white in a message as much political as on the game. The 3.48-minute […]]]>

HAVING showcased the state’s Dravidian heritage at the impressive inaugural ceremony of the 44th Chess Olympiad on Thursday, the government of Tamil Nadu did better. Chief Minister MK Stalin has posted a video “Chess Dance” where the black queen triumphs over the white in a message as much political as on the game.

The 3.48-minute dance video, titled Check Mate, is the brainchild of Pudukottai district collector Kavitha Ramu, who is herself a trained dancer.

Speaking to the Sunday Express, Ramu, who designed and choreographed the dance, said for her that the project was about color, sex and power, as well as being a tribute to the game that made Chennai its house in the country.

As the DMK government rolls out the red carpet for the event, Ramu said, “I wanted it to be a chess dance, with elements of classical, folk and martial arts, to make it vibrant and colorful.”

While holding the auditions in Pudukottai, the dance was shot in Chennai. “As I could not join the dancers in Chennai due to work commitments, the director, Vijey Raj, sent me video clips and stills from the shoot.” Praising his meticulous commitment to the project, she says she wanted to make sure the dance stuck strictly to chess moves.

Among the critical elements was the good music, and it was composed by Narendra Kumar Lakshmipathy.

Pudukottai District Collector Kavitha Ramu

Ramu said that given the concept, the project was designed around the triumph of the black queen despite the white having the first-mover advantage.

The Black Queen of Dancing is played by Priyadarshini Rajendran, a Bharatanatyam dancer from Pudukottai, who works in the computer industry in Bengaluru and plays chess. Laughing that she still prefers black, Rajendran says, “Some of us think black has a better chance, maybe counter-intuitive.”

What makes the finesse of the final video even more special is the fact that the team only did two days of rehearsals, followed by filming that lasted 24 hours, from 6 a.m. one day , the next morning.

The creative director, Raj, who has worked as a co-director in some Tamil films, says they originally conceived the dance as a music video. “But the plan changed to a visual story about the game, with more specific characters and black as a metaphor. It was a huge challenge to tell the whole story in a few minutes. Many artists had never been in front of a camera.

The dance video is the brainchild of Pudukottai Collector Kavitha Ramu

According to Raju, the creative freedom Ramu gave greatly helped in projecting a “compelling narrative”.

Rajendran says they were fully prepared the moment they entered for the shoot. “We were all told the whole story, from start to finish. As the dark queen, I had maximum moves. As a Bharatanatyam dancer, I thought I would use these steps, but it wasn’t planned that way. It was choreographed in such a way that the focus is on the dynamics of collective bodily movement.

So as she moved one square at a time, like the queen on a chessboard, she was surrounded by faces painted in the traditional Tamil art form in which humans dress up as horses.

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Suram Sahana, who has already collaborated with Ramu in many dance shows, played the white queen.

The white king was Srinivas, a classical dancer. Manikantan, a freestyle dancer, was the black king. Artists Poikkaal kudhirai Muthukuran, Deepan, Baskar and Cheran, Manigandan, Karthigeyan, Manojkumar, Prathapan, Karthick, Lakshmanan, Divakar, Priyadarshan, Nishanthi, Oorvasi, Rithika Jayalakshmi, Narmatha, Krupavathi, Durga and Soundarya were also part of the video.

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South Carolina residents play chess in Colombia https://echecs-faciles.com/south-carolina-residents-play-chess-in-colombia/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 04:39:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/south-carolina-residents-play-chess-in-colombia/ Chess players traveling from Florence, Charlotte or further afield to participate in the Columbia Chess Club. COLUMBIA, SC – Every Thursday is a full house at the Firefly Toy and Game Storewhere the Colombia Chess Club meets weekly. “It’s just great to see so many people connecting to chess, it’s like music, there’s something for […]]]>

Chess players traveling from Florence, Charlotte or further afield to participate in the Columbia Chess Club.

COLUMBIA, SC – Every Thursday is a full house at the Firefly Toy and Game Storewhere the Colombia Chess Club meets weekly.

“It’s just great to see so many people connecting to chess, it’s like music, there’s something for everyone,” said club member Harrison Walsh.

Anyone between the ages of 8 and 78 comes to play.

RELATED: Community Members Work to Revitalize Broad River Road District

“I’m still learning, and it keeps my mind sharp as I get older,” said chess player John Brown.

The team started a year ago and are welcoming more people every week according to club founder James Brandmair.

“We normally welcome 30 to 40 people each week, but we have room for around 66 at the moment,” he explained.

Several people at the club have been playing for months or years, but they say you don’t have to know how to play to get out.

“There is so much to learn here and people who are always ready to teach”

Some people at the club travel all the way from Florence and even Rock Hill to hang out with their favorite brain game each week.

“It’s like an hour and 30 minutes, and basically like 4 hours either way, but I like coming here because I have about three hours of game time and I always make friends,” said declared

RELATED: West Nile virus found in Columbia, mosquito spray town

The group meets every Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m. and hosts a tournament that costs $5 to enter at 6 p.m. each week.

On August 6, the Chess Club will host The Colombia Open Tournament at the First Church of the Nazarene. The tournament will last all day from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The registration fee is $35.

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“Most fled, I play alone”: how chess fell victim to Taliban politics in Afghanistan https://echecs-faciles.com/most-fled-i-play-alone-how-chess-fell-victim-to-taliban-politics-in-afghanistan/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:41:10 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/most-fled-i-play-alone-how-chess-fell-victim-to-taliban-politics-in-afghanistan/ In one word, spoken coldly, Sepehr Sekhawaty captures the fate of failures in Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover, “Terrible”. But he says he has nothing to complain about, as he is just happy to be alive and playing the game, a privilege few could afford. After the re-conquest of the Taliban, they banned all sports […]]]>

In one word, spoken coldly, Sepehr Sekhawaty captures the fate of failures in Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover, “Terrible”.

But he says he has nothing to complain about, as he is just happy to be alive and playing the game, a privilege few could afford.

After the re-conquest of the Taliban, they banned all sports for women and began to suppress streams which they thought contradicted their doctrine. Chess, they believed, was a form of gambling and distracted people from saying their prayers, as well as carrying the Soviet stigma. Although they didn’t officially ban the game, as they did during their previous reign, they cut off his arms.

The difficulties of being a chess player in a country intolerant of the game, and to an extension most sports, are immeasurable, he says. Fearing a backlash from the Taliban, most chess clubs frantically shut down, most chess players stopped playing, and even federation officials fled. The president sought refuge in Latvia while several others emigrated to Uzbekistan. “For months I had no one to play chess with. Even the president of the federation fled the country. So there are a lot of senior players and officials. I was playing alone in my room,” says Sepehr, originally from Herat, some 900 kilometers from Kabul.

Or when there was electricity and the internet, he would browse chess websites, download game diagrams featuring the top 100 players, play a few games, and if time permitted, read up on his player favorite, Bobby Fischer. Forget the training camps, he hasn’t met his Olympiad colleagues for months. To get into the rhythm before the Olympiad, he traveled about 600 grueling kilometers by road to Tehran to compete in three tournaments. “I started playing the game alone when I was seven years old, and now I’m 19 and I’m still alone. There is no coach or colleague. Most of them have fled the country , and I just manage to play chess thanks to my father’s support. But I can’t keep troubling him forever,” he says.

Sepehr Sekhawaty plays chess. (Instagram)

The Chess Olympiad was his dream, a dream he almost didn’t achieve. He had practically no money to buy tickets. “There was no funding and all we got as a stipend was $25 in three months. Luckily, my dad bought the tickets for me and I hope the federation will reimburse me after I arrive in Chennai,” he says.

A bigger hurdle was getting the go-ahead from the government. For several weeks, he was unsure whether to travel to Chennai as his government kept refusing permission. He was anxiously checking news or information from his friends in the media. Finally, last Saturday, he obtained approval.

Sepehr Sekhawaty with a trophy. (Instagram)

Equally suffocating was the fear of Maroof, the religious police. The chess fraternity fears a ban on the sport like it happened in 1996. Old stories haunt them – police would burn chess boards, pieces, imprison them for weeks, fine them and threaten to cut their hands if they played again. . The chess players, fearing being denounced, had to meet in secret. But even that came to a halt when the police stepped up the crackdown.

Reverse Progress

Freed after the exit of the Taliban two decades ago, chess had begun to flourish again. “Over the past five years, chess has grown rapidly. We could afford to hire a grandmaster as a trainer, opened branches in 28 provinces across the country, had around 10,000 active players and held the FIDE Arbiter and Trainers Seminar in 2019,” details the former Secretary General of the national federation Abasin Mohibi.

Sepehr could also travel abroad for competitions and was a regular at tournaments in India and Iran, at a time when he was accumulating a wealth of experience and points. But fewer tournaments naturally meant stagnating points (he only managed 1,809).

Sepehr Sekhawaty. (Instagram)

The emergence was further marked after Afghanistan won gold in Category D of the Chess Olympiad in 2019. But all that progress has been turned upside down in the last 11 months.

“Eleven months into the Taliban regime, there has not been a single official tournament, seminar or related activity. Most federation officials have left the country. In some provinces, chess has been banned. The federation’s women’s department is currently closed, and there are no active players either,” says Mohibi.

The Taliban have been particularly harsh on female athletes. Several had to flee the country, many others had to completely stop their flows and burn documents or material that betrayed that they were athletes. Even women’s cricket was stopped – under their last regime, the Taliban banned women and girls from getting an education or working as well. Mohibi sighs: “People are busy rebuilding lives. It’s a tough life for us.

Fleeing the country seems the only realistic alternative to forging a career in chess, although Sepehr does not want to leave his country. “I really love my country and I care about it,” he says emotionally, but admits he would eventually pay attention. “I will certainly accept any offer from countries where chess is important so that I can achieve my goals and objectives. But who would want me? he asks, in a deflated tone.

But Sepehr does not want to give up. “I want to win individual gold in the third board and help the team win gold in our category. That would mean something in these times,” he says. Gold that would be a metaphor for challenge, though they would not be paraded as heroes when they returned home.

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NC World Masters: Anand leads with one lap to go https://echecs-faciles.com/nc-world-masters-anand-leads-with-one-lap-to-go/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 08:50:29 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/nc-world-masters-anand-leads-with-one-lap-to-go/ Not prepared Master class vol. 12: Viswanathan Anand This DVD allows you to learn from the example of one of the best players in the history of chess and the explanations of the authors how to successfully organize your games strategically, therefore how to keep your opponent under constant pressure The NC World Masters at […]]]>

Not prepared

The NC World Masters at the 49th Dortmund International Chess Festival saw Daniel Fridman take on Viswanathan Anand and Michael Adams take on Dmitrij Kollars on Saturday. After losing to Anand for the second time in the event, Fridman confessed:

My preparation was complete today when I went on stage. I saw that the seat in front of Dmitrij was already occupied, and I prepared myself for the black game against him. Then I improvised against Vishy.

We saw 1.Nf3 on stage for the first time in No-Castling Chess. An interesting position emerged after the opening, in which black had everything under control. Fridman went into a slightly worse final, and when he had a chance he tied by a triple rep.

The game between Adams and Kollars again saw the popular pattern of f3 or …f6 to place the king on f2 or f7. White captured the pair of bishops, but the black pawn structure was intact. Both contenders played strong, so the match was deservedly drawn.

There’s still a lot to play for in the final round: the match between Anand and Adams will decide who wins the tournament title.


Ranking after the 5th round


All the games

Eljanov and Deac score

There were two impressive victories in the German Grand Prix on the Golden Hall stage of the Westfalenhallen Dortmund Congress Center.

When Pavel Eljanov entered the press center after the match, there was particular praise from Vishy Anand, who described his play as “very impressive”. We have rarely seen someone beat European champion Matthias Blübaum in such a strategic way. Eljanov caught the pair of bishops early on and improved his pieces bit by bit.

Eljanov decisively captured the pawn on e4 and went on to win the game to take the lead before the last turn.

Luke McShane has played a solid tournament so far, but in round 6 he lost to Romanian star Bogdan-Daniel Deac. Deac started the match very quickly, so both players had time problems early on. In zeitnot, the youngster kept the advantage and coolly exploited McShane’s mistake 32…Ng6.

After move 40, Deac found himself in a winning position. For McShane, the tournament is over, as he is free on Sunday and will be commentating the final round live.

The decision will be between Eljanov and Deac. For Deac, it’s not just about winning a tournament, but also breaking the magic barrier of 2700.

Pavel Eljanov


Current ranking


All the games

Artem Lutsko on his way to an IM standard

In the Women’s Sportland NRW Cup a WGM standard is no longer possible, but in the Sportland NRW Youth Cup an IM standard for Artem Lutsko is within reach.

Lara Schulze plays an exceptional tournament and was the only leader before the eighth round. Also on Saturday, things went well for her at the start of the match. But the advantage evaporated and then Schulze made a big blunder, gave up a piece and lost the game.

Schulze is tied for the lead with Zoya Schleining. But the WGM standard is unfortunately no longer within reach.

Sportland NRW Cup leader IM Jonathan Carlstedt also lost his game today. He later explained, congratulating his opponent:

Leonardo Costa was clearly the strongest player today, he played very well and I deserved to lose. Luckily, I accumulated a few errors in one game today and didn’t scatter them over different games.

Artem Lutsko, meanwhile, beat GM Alexander Bagrationi with Black. The young Ukrainian is playing a big tournament and is now level on points with Carlstedt. A draw against the last player on the board, Timo Leonard, will be enough for him to reach the coveted IM standard in Sunday’s final round.

Jasper Holtel outstanding in the Sparkassen Open A

The winner of the Dortmund International Festival A-Open is almost decided after sole leader Max Warmerdam was drawn. Behind him, Jasper Holtel draws attention.

After turning down an early draw and winning in the previous round, Warmerdam was very happy with a draw against GM Andreas Heimann. Heimann accepted the draw offer after 13 moves with black. Warmerdam thus leads by one point before the last round, and the victory of the tournament will hardly be taken away from him on Sunday (the kick-off is given at 1:30 p.m.).

The duel between FM Jasper Holtel and GM Tornike Sanikidze also ended in a draw. Sanikidze had a crazy advantageous ending, but it wasn’t enough to win.

Holtel now has 5 wins and 3 draws, including two against grandmasters.

Connections

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Biel: Le and Esipenko will face each other in the showdown https://echecs-faciles.com/biel-le-and-esipenko-will-face-each-other-in-the-showdown/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 23:06:45 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/biel-le-and-esipenko-will-face-each-other-in-the-showdown/ Maximum suspense Press release One round from the end of the Biel Chess Festival, nothing is decided yet. The Grandmaster Triathlon and Women’s Quad will feature head-to-head encounters between the first and second entrants in battles for the respective titles. In the Grandmaster Triathlon, Le Quang Liem beat Arkadij Naiditsch with the white pieces, while […]]]>

Maximum suspense

Press release

One round from the end of the Biel Chess Festival, nothing is decided yet. The Grandmaster Triathlon and Women’s Quad will feature head-to-head encounters between the first and second entrants in battles for the respective titles.

In the Grandmaster Triathlon, Le Quang Liem beat Arkadij Naiditsch with the white pieces, while his last round opponent, Andrey Esipenko, remains close thanks to his victory against Nodirbek Abdusattorov.

Gukesh, on the other hand, had to settle for a draw against last year’s winner Gata Kamsky, meaning he can no longer win the event.

In the women’s tournament, point guard Zhuang Yongzhe drew, allowing Iris Ciarletta to take the lead with her victory over Yulia Avilova.

The Swiss Youth Championships ended on Thursday. The new national title holders are:

  • Seyed Arvin Kasipour Azbari (U16)
  • Matthias Mattenberger (U14)
  • Kala Kishan Udipi (U12)
  • Jan Saminsky (U10)
  • Leon Krokowski-Bednarz (U8)

The wins a third consecutive victory

In the GMT Grandmaster Triathlon, Le Quang Liem beat Arkadij Naiditsch to retain the lead. The Vietnamese GM is yet to draw a classic match in Biel, as he has won four times (including the last three matches) and lost once so far in the event’s most heavily weighted section.

Andrey Esipenko, thanks to his victory with the blacks over Nodirbek Abdusattorov, rose to second place. Gukesh vs. Gata Kamsky and Vincent Keymer vs. Saleh Salem ended in draws.

With one lap to go, Le is first with 34 points, Esipenko is second with 31 points and Gukesh is third with 29½ points. Abdusattorov (26½ points) can still fight for a place on the podium.

Note that in the classic section, wins are worth 4 points and draws are worth 1½ points.

Grandmaster Triathlon – Ranking

Rank Last name Games Classic Fast Blitz Total
1 GM Le Quang Liem 27 16 11 seven 34
2 GM Andrey Esipenko 27 14 ten seven 31
3 GM Dommaraju Gukesh 27 15 seven 29½
4 GM Nodirbek Abdusattorov 27 9 8 26½
5 GM Saleh Salem 27 seven seven 8 22
6 GM Gata Kamsky 27 ten 1 19½
seven GM Vincent Keymer 27 6 5 8 19
8 GM Arkadij Naiditsch 27 6 2 16½

All Games – Classic

Find all the games on Live.ChessBase.com: Classic | Fast | Blitz

DAQ: Ciarletta, the youngest participant, now on top

Iris Ciarletta beat Yulia Avilova to take the lead with 36 points. Former point guard Zhuang Yongzhe only drew and is now second with 35 points, half a point ahead of Juliette Cornileau who won a very important match against Margaux Moracchini.

Ciarletta will have the white pieces against Zhuang in the final round, while Cornileau, who still has an outside chance to win the event, will face Sumarriva with black.

The final round starts four hours earlier than usual (10:00 a.m. CEST, 04:00 a.m. ET)!

Biel Chess Festival 2022

Women’s Quadriathlon – Ranking

Rank Last name Chess960 Classic Fast Blitz Total
1 Iris Ciarlette 9 12 36
2 Zhuang Yongzhe 15 ten 35
3 Juliet Cornileau 13½ ten 34½
4 Margaux Moracchini 1 16 5 9 31
5 Gohar Tamrazian 15 8 31
6 Laura Sumarriva Paulin 3 seven 8 26½
seven Yulia Avilova 4 3 5 19½
8 Cecile Keymer 3 2* 2 15½

* scored by Veronika Kostina

All Games – Classic

The young Swiss champions have been crowned

As part of the Biel Chess Festival, the young Swiss champions of the U16, U14, U12, U10 and U8 categories were crowned for the third time in a row.

Over seven rounds, the country’s top 16 players by category (U8: top eight) battled it out to win the national championship. The following players made it to the podium in their respective age brackets:

  • U16 podium: 1. Seyed Arvin Kasipour Azbari (SG Riehen), 2. Simon Schellenberg (Pfäffikon ZH), 3. Raphael Erne (Neuchâtel CE)
  • U14 podium: 1. Matthias Mattenberger (DSSP), 2. Suvirr Malli (Olten), 3. Cristian Marc Arsenie (SK Bern)
  • U12 podium: 1. Kala Kishan Udipi (Zürich Wollishofen), 2. Maximilian Pfaltz (Chess Academy), 3. Mihaly Köhalmi-Szabo (SK Markus Regez)
  • U10 podium: 1. Jan Saminskij (SG Zurich), 2. Vishak Chockalingam (SG Riehen), 3. Mischa Domschke (DSSP)
  • U8 Podium: 1. Leon Krokowski-Bednarz (Zürich Chess4Kids), 2. Vardhan Devarasetty (Academy Chess), 3. Vivian Varghese (Academy Chess)

Full results: U16 | U14 | U12 | U10 | U8

MTO: Alekseenko and Muradli in the lead

In the Master Tournament MTO, Vikash and Kirill Alekseenko shot the top board. This allowed Azerbaijani GM Mahammad Muradli to take Alekseenko into the lead after beating Alexander Motylev on lap 8.

Alekseenko and Muradli are now leading with 6½ points. They are chased by a group of four 6-pointers, and ten 5½-pointers, some of whom have excellent tiebreaker scores.

Alekseenko will likely go for outright victory in the final round as he will have the white pieces against his lowest rated direct rival!

Ranking after the eighth round


1 Alekseenko Kirill 6.5 34.5
2 Mouradli Mahammad 6.5 34.5
3 Sarkissian’s Shant 6.0 36.5
4 Visakh RN 6.0 36.5
5 Sethuraman SP 6.0 36.0
6 Mendonca Leon Luke 6.0 34.5
seven Pranav Anand 5.5 38.0
8 Motylev Alexander 5.5 37.0
9 Martirosyan Haik M. 5.5 35.5
ten Fedoseev Vladimir 5.5 35.0
11 Puranik Abhimanyu 5.5 35.0
12 Iturrizaga Bonelli Eduardo 5.5 34.5
13 Erdos Viktor 5.5 33.5
14 Pavlovic Milos 5.5 32.0
15 Raja Harshit 5.5 31.5

…114 players

All games available – Round 8

Find all available games at Live.ChessBase.com

Connections

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