Chess player – Echecs Faciles http://echecs-faciles.com/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 05:43:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://echecs-faciles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-80x80.png Chess player – Echecs Faciles http://echecs-faciles.com/ 32 32 New: Understanding Midgame Strategies Vol.5 + Vol.6 by Ivan Sokolov https://echecs-faciles.com/new-understanding-midgame-strategies-vol-5-vol-6-by-ivan-sokolov/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 05:43:21 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/new-understanding-midgame-strategies-vol-5-vol-6-by-ivan-sokolov/ Understanding Midgame Strategies: Vol. 5 – Sicilian structures Rossolimo and Maroczy by Ivan Sokolov The Rossolimo has recently gained popularity because it eschews open Sicilian theory such as the Sveshnikov or the Kalashnikov. Essentially we reach an English opening with inverted suits (1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 (or 2…Bb4) 3.g3 Bb4) being one tempo up. As […]]]>

Understanding Midgame Strategies: Vol. 5 – Sicilian structures Rossolimo and Maroczy by Ivan Sokolov

The Rossolimo has recently gained popularity because it eschews open Sicilian theory such as the Sveshnikov or the Kalashnikov. Essentially we reach an English opening with inverted suits (1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 (or 2…Bb4) 3.g3 Bb4) being one tempo up.

As with most inverted color schemes, we now (as whites) have a comfortable position (the extra tempo matters after all!), but our focus also changes (because we are no longer satisfied with a “comfortable position”. “but let’s aim for an advantage).

None other than Magnus Carlsen plays this opening to a large extent, which is a key part of the selection on this video course. We mainly analyze plans after 3…g6 (followed by Bxc6 with both …bxc6 or …dxc6 recaptures) or 3…e6 4.Bxc6 bxc6.

At first glance, white has a “clear advantage” in the Marcozy Bind: white has more space, black has no clear counterplay. Danish chess legend Bent Larsen enjoyed playing the Maroczy Bind with Black and came up with many ideas that are still viable today.

In this video course, my material is based on the classic main line Maroczy binding, I’ve highlighted the main ideas/positions that both sides are aiming for and show surprising strategic mistakes (committed even in high-level games!) .

• Video length: 7 hours and 20 minutes (in English)

• With interactive training including video feedback

• Extra: Model game database and practice with ChessBase apps – Play key positions against Fritz at different levels

Understanding Midgame Strategies: Vol. 6 – Works Ruy López

Anatoly Karpov once said: “Understanding Ruy Lopez is crucial for improving the middle game in chess”. On this video course, I opted for ‘Karpov Ruy Lopez Understanding Type Lines’, with the vast majority of the material coming from variations by Chigorin, Breyer and Zaitsev.

I’ve tried to give viewers a “crash course” in typical midgame planes, typical ideas of material imbalance (and dynamics), types of positions White or Black should be happy with (or try to avoid!), while combining them (when I saw fit) with useful opening tips (tips based on my forty years of experience playing and researching these positions).

The course aims to improve the understanding of these types of positions to help the spectator play better and achieve better results.

• Video length: 6 hours and 25 minutes (in English)

• With interactive training including video feedback

• Extra: Model game database and practice with ChessBase apps – Play key positions against Fritz at different levels

Required configuration

Minimum: Dual Core, 2 GB RAM, Windows 7, DirectX 11 graphics card with 256 MB RAM, Windows Media Player 9, ChessBase 14/Fritz 16 or included player and Internet access for program activation.

Recommended: Intel i5 (Quadcore) PC, 4 GB RAM, Windows 10, DirectX11, graphics card with 512 MB RAM or more, 100% DirectX10 compatible sound card, Windows Media Player 11, (DVD-ROM drive) and Internet access for activating the program.

Mac OS X

Minimum: MacOS “Yosemite” 10.10

About Ivan Sokolov

Ivan Sokolov is a Dutch chess grandmaster and author of popular chess books. He was champion of Yugoslavia in 1988 and champion of the Netherlands in 1995 and 1998. For more than two decades he was among the elite players and beat many of the strongest players in the world.


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BASIS Chandler junior a prodigy on the chessboard https://echecs-faciles.com/basis-chandler-junior-a-prodigy-on-the-chessboard/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 06:08:56 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/basis-chandler-junior-a-prodigy-on-the-chessboard/ By Egan AdlerCronkite News At the end of each match, Sandeep Sethuraman looks his opponent in the eye and mutters one word: checkmate. “The expectation is 36-0 every year. To win every game I play in the year. The goal is to win the state championship again,” said Sethuraman, a 15-year-old chess player. year-old world-ranked […]]]>

By Egan Adler
Cronkite News

At the end of each match, Sandeep Sethuraman looks his opponent in the eye and mutters one word: checkmate.

“The expectation is 36-0 every year. To win every game I play in the year. The goal is to win the state championship again,” said Sethuraman, a 15-year-old chess player. year-old world-ranked who is a junior at BASIS Chandler.”There are five boards and we need three out of five every game to win.”

The high school student grew up in the world of chess ever since he started playing when his grandmother taught him the rules when he was young. By the middle of the seventh year, Sethuraman had qualified as a National Master and in 2021 he achieved the title of FIDE Master.

He currently ranks 2,532 out of all active players worldwide, according to the International Chess Federation.

These titles, which take years to earn, are decided in national and international tournaments and follow the Elo system, the most commonly used rating system in chess. The system divides international chess players into number categories starting with Novice and continuing through Super Grandmaster, the unofficial title for players with a rating above 2700.

Sethuraman currently sits at 2371 – just 29 points below the title of International Master, according to the Elo system.

“I am pushing to become an international Master. I have two of the three required standards and am at 2370-ish and need to reach 2400 to become an International Masters. I hope to become one by the end of this school year,” Sethuraman said.

However, his quest for chess supremacy will not detract from his commitment to the BASIS Chandler team. During last year’s AIA season, Sethuraman swept the singles competition while defeating the championship’s highest-ranked player, Brophy’s Mason Miller, to win the state championship for BASIS Chandler.

A year later, Sethuraman’s role is both captain and coach for his teammates. He got so good that even his trainer, Radhika Guruju, realized she didn’t have much to teach him. Instead, Guruju aids his superstar in the mental side of the game.

“Chess is a very mental game. Teams can intimidate you, opponents can intimidate you, so (you) don’t want to watch them too much and listen to their stupid talk,” Guruju said. of your game the most important game of the day.”

With Sethuraman set to lead the BASIS Chandler team for the next two seasons, anything less than a state championship would be a disappointment. However, Guruju is used to high expectations. After gaining approval to join the AIA, she is the only coach the BASIS team has ever known and has never finished below the top five since the program’s inaugural season.

“We feel the pressure because you win so many years and you have this reputation and expectation to win again,” Guruju said. “I tell my team to play the board, not to play the person sitting across from you, the team across from you.

“Make your game the most fun game for you, so that you don’t focus on a teammate’s game. From the moment you enter a tournament until the moment you leave it, you have to stay focused.

Matt FritzMiller, Principal of BASIS Chandler, took a step back as he watched his chess program grow into one of the best in the state.

“What I do is I don’t hold them back. I let them do what they need. They are such talented and amazing chess players, and years ago they wanted to join the AIA so we let them, and it went really, really well,” FritzMiller said. “The best thing I can do for them is to let them do their job and support them in any way I can.

Sethuraman is ready to take another step in the international chess world. He plans to bypass the individual state tournament in November to focus on the US Masters tournament in Charlotte over Thanksgiving weekend, where a successful performance will put him on the path to the International Masters ranking.

He also used chess to give back to the community by founding The Chess Effect, a non-profit organization designed to teach underprivileged children chess. Through his efforts, he had raised $900 for Arizona Helping Hands, an organization focused on providing essential services to children in foster care.

The chess prodigy has no doubt that the sport will continue to play an important role in his life. Nevertheless, he knows that this is only one of the many paths his future holds for him.

“I will try to get the Grandmaster title,” said Sethuraman. “I want to continue playing chess for the rest of my life and even though I want to go to university and may not be able to devote the same amount of time to it, I still want to be a player and/or a coach.”

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New Zealand scores 152/4 against Pakistan https://echecs-faciles.com/new-zealand-scores-152-4-against-pakistan/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 09:45:44 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/new-zealand-scores-152-4-against-pakistan/ CHENNAI: Daryl Mitchell hit a timely unbeaten fifty to help New Zealand post a decent 152-for-four against Pakistan in the first SCG slow-court semi-final here on Wednesday. Opting for the bat, the New Zealand batters found it difficult on a worn SCG track as they struggled to connect the ball due to the sluggishness of […]]]>

CHENNAI: Daryl Mitchell hit a timely unbeaten fifty to help New Zealand post a decent 152-for-four against Pakistan in the first SCG slow-court semi-final here on Wednesday.

Opting for the bat, the New Zealand batters found it difficult on a worn SCG track as they struggled to connect the ball due to the sluggishness of the box. Mitchell (53 out of 35) and skipper Kane Williamson (46 out of 42) resurrected New Zealand’s heats after early jolts to take the runner-up from last edition past the 150-point mark.

Finn Allen started his innings confidently, hitting Shaheen Afridi’s (2/24) full delivery on the ground after midfield for a boundary. Afridi, however, hit Allen on the pads on the next delivery and on-field referee Marius Erasmus took time before raising his finger. But the batter got a reprieve as TV replays showed it was an inside edge on the pads.

But Afridi put her man in the very next ball with another LBW shoutout and this time it was straight up, even though Allen went for an unsuccessful review.

Fellow fly-half Devon Conway (21) tried to force the innings with three limits but was taken out by a straight throw from Shadab Khan halfway through. But new man Glenn Phillips lasted just eight balls, left-arm spinner Mohammad Nawaz coming straight at him as New Zealand slumped to 49 for three from eight overs.

Thereafter, Williamson and Mitchell held the innings together and shared 68 runs on 50 balls for the fourth wicket. While Williamson played the role of anchor, mostly dealing with ones and twos with occasional boundaries in between, Mitchell was at his aggressive best.

The duo raised their stand by fifty points in just 36 balls, but failed to force the pace towards the end as the limits and sixes were hard to come by. Williamson was down four within a half, knocked down by Afridi in the 17th with a slower stroke as the batter went for a ball over the keeper’s head.

After Williamson left, Mitchell held on innings for the Kiwis and reached his fifty on 32 balls. With James Neesham (16 not out), Mitchell sewed an unbeaten 35 on 22 balls but failed to deliver the final shot as the Pakistani bowlers made a strong comeback.

Pakistan (playing XI): Mohammad Rizwan (w), Babar Azam (c), Mohammad Nawaz, Mohammad Haris, Shan Masood, Iftikhar Ahmed, Shadab Khan, Mohammad Wasim Jr, Naseem Shah, Haris Rauf, Shaheen Afridi

New Zealand (playing XI): Finn Allen, Devon Conway(w), Kane Williamson(c), Glenn Phillips, Daryl Mitchell, James Neesham, Mitchell Santner, Tim Southee, Ish Sodhi, Lockie Ferguson, Trent Boult

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Lei Tingjie advances to the female candidates final https://echecs-faciles.com/lei-tingjie-advances-to-the-female-candidates-final/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 10:24:17 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/lei-tingjie-advances-to-the-female-candidates-final/ A Grünfeld gone wrong Most of the excitement in Pool A of the female contestants was seen during the first six days of action, when Lei Tingjie and Anna Muzychuk won matches played against Mariya Muzychuk and Humpy Koneru, respectively. The final of this group (only half of the Candidates field took part in this […]]]>

A Grünfeld gone wrong

Most of the excitement in Pool A of the female contestants was seen during the first six days of action, when Lei Tingjie and Anna Muzychuk won matches played against Mariya Muzychuk and Humpy Koneru, respectively.

The final of this group (only half of the Candidates field took part in this stage) was rather a tense and balanced competition, with rather certain draws in the first three games. The fourth encounter, however, saw Lei prevail on the white side of a Grünfeld to secure a place in the tournament final.

The second runner-up will be chosen by December 11. Aleksandra Goryachkina, Alexandra Kosteniuk, Kateryna Lagno and Tan Zhongyi are the participants in Pool B, which will be a similar knockout. will take place in Khiva, Uzbekistan.

Lei Tingjie face Anna Muzychuk | Photo: Michal Walusza

In the game, things quickly started to go wrong for Muzychuk, as white had better minor pieces and threatened to advance their connected center pawns out of the opening.

Trying to prevent White’s c-pawn from reaching the fourth rank, Muzychuk opted for 19…Rfc8 after thinking for more than ten minutes. At that point, 19…Nc8 was his best chance to hold the balance, with the intention of redirecting the knight to d6 — but it’s never easy to play such backward moves so early. in the game.

The problem with choosing Muzychuk is that after 20.Bg4, black will allow the c-pawn to advance or forgo an exchange. In fact, this last alternative, with 20…Nc4, is the computer’s suggestion — but again, it’s hard to make such concessions early on.

Black therefore opted for 20…Kd8and white was quick to consolidate his structural advantage, pushing his pawns to c4 and g4, creating strong connections on both sides of the board.

Seven moves later, Lei had made significant progress, and here caught a pawn with 27.Bxe7, gaining material while Black’s army is still uncoordinated. The flashy 27.Ke6 also won in this position — after 27…fxe6 28.Qxe6, White would wreak havoc on the kingside along the light squares!

The text move was also a winner, however, and Lei eventually reached a bishop vs. knight ending with two more pawns.

Blanc had no problem in the technical phase. The Chinese Grandmaster thus obtained the decisive victory which earned her a ticket to the final match of the female candidates.

2022 Female Candidates Tournament

The knockout tournament took place at the luxurious Hotel Hermitage in Monte Carlo | Photo: Michal Walusza

All the games


The Sicilian closed

The closed Sicilian offers White an easy-to-understand set of plans, the possibility of a kingside attack, and little danger of being overwhelmed by tactics in the opening.


Connections

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PCAP’s QC Simba’s Tribe wood pushers to compete in Marikina Chess Tournament https://echecs-faciles.com/pcaps-qc-simbas-tribe-wood-pushers-to-compete-in-marikina-chess-tournament/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 22:05:23 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/pcaps-qc-simbas-tribe-wood-pushers-to-compete-in-marikina-chess-tournament/ PCAP’s QC Simba’s Tribe wood pushers to compete in Marikina Chess Tournament By Marlon BernardinPhilBoxing.comFri 04 Nov 2022 MANILA — The invitational chess tournament honoring 94-year-old Tatay Domeng Santos, the oldest player in the Marikina chess community, will field the Quezon City Simba Tribe wood pusher troop of the PCAP who will battle it out […]]]>

PCAP’s QC Simba’s Tribe wood pushers to compete in Marikina Chess Tournament

By Marlon Bernardin
PhilBoxing.com
Fri 04 Nov 2022

MANILA — The invitational chess tournament honoring 94-year-old Tatay Domeng Santos, the oldest player in the Marikina chess community, will field the Quezon City Simba Tribe wood pusher troop of the PCAP who will battle it out for chess supremacy on November 6, Sunday at the Marikina Riverside Gazeebo.

The Quezon City Simba Tribe wood pushers who will compete in the five-round Swiss system competition consist of Freddie Talaboc and Elizsa Gayle Cafirma.

Additionally, well-known blitz contenders Jian Carlo Rivera, April Joy Ramos, Raffy Lobitaña, Edwin Tendencia, Jayson Esparagoza, Joseph Gabriel, Cayanan and Ric Alvarado have also signed up for the tournament in Marikina.

According to organizer, Johnny “Joel” Gaudia of the Marikina Chess Federation, the event will feature Class A (expert), Class B (intermediate), Class C (novice) and Under 14 (d by November 2022, children born on or after 2008), and will apply a time control of 10 minutes plus 3 seconds per player. The competition starts at 9:00 a.m.

No less than Asia’s first Grand Master (GM), Eugene Torre, will perform the traditional ceremonial movements along with Gaudia, FA Chief Referee Rudy Ibanez and NA Assistant Referee Ranier Pascual.

This is a free registration, free lunch and merienda tournament sanctioned by the National Chess Federation of the Philippines (NCFP), open to all non-titled Marikina chess players and players from neighboring communities. Limited to first 120 registrants only.

The top 3 winners in each category will each receive 1000P, 700P and 500P. Trophies to the champions of each category and medals to the other winners will also be awarded. For U14s, all cash prizes will be converted into gift vouchers.
Contact persons Sir Johnny “Joel” Gaudia and Sir Rolly Tamayo at the Riverside.-Marlon Bernardino-

Click here to see a list of other articles written by Marlon Bernardino.


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    V4 Chess Presents 1st Bishan Singh Ji Memorial All India Open FIDE Rating Chess Tournament https://echecs-faciles.com/v4-chess-presents-1st-bishan-singh-ji-memorial-all-india-open-fide-rating-chess-tournament/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 20:12:33 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/v4-chess-presents-1st-bishan-singh-ji-memorial-all-india-open-fide-rating-chess-tournament/ CHESS Trust V4 V4 CHESS is a trust formed by the four leading chess players based in Hyderabad since the 1990s. 1. Ramu Kandi, MBA (FIDE Master, FIDE Trainer and Founder of Chess Mavericks), 2. Sardar Amithpal Singh, MCA (Master Candidate, FIDE Instructor and Founder of Maestro Chess Academy), 3. Rishpal Singh, MCA (FIDE Master, […]]]>

    CHESS Trust V4

    V4 CHESS is a trust formed by the four leading chess players based in Hyderabad since the 1990s.

    1. Ramu Kandi, MBA (FIDE Master, FIDE Trainer and Founder of Chess Mavericks),

    2. Sardar Amithpal Singh, MCA (Master Candidate, FIDE Instructor and Founder of Maestro Chess Academy),

    3. Rishpal Singh, MCA (FIDE Master, FIDE Trainer and Founder of Deccan Chess Academy), and

    4. Benish Bhatia, MS (CS) (former national sub-junior and U-18 champion)

    These four chess friends who are also coaches, parents and organizers have teamed up to promote the game of chess through various programs such as chess tournaments, training camps and other promotional activities that will raise awareness of the chess game to the masses and will help budding youngsters and aspiring chess players realize their potential and pursue their dreams.

    From left to right: 1. Beenish Bhatia, 2. Rishpal Singh, 3. Kandi Ramu and 4. Amithpal Singh

    1st Chess Tournament V4

    As part of its first initiative, V4 CHESS is organizing two chess tournaments in India, namely…

    1. “SARDAR BISHAN SINGH JI MEMORIAL ALL INDIA OPEN FIDE RATING TOURNAMENT” from December 24 to 28, 2022.

    2. “V4 CHESS ALL INDIA OPEN FIDE RATING TOURNAMENT FOR BELOW 1600 RATED PLAYERS” Feb 3-5, 2023.

    Location and price

    Both of these tournaments will be held at Kotla Vijay Bhasker Reddy Indoor Stadium, Yousufguda Hyderabad, Telangana.

    An international GM tournament held in the Vijay Bhasker Reddy indoor stadium.

    In total, the prize fund for these 2 events is Rs. 20,00,001/-. For all titled players, the entrance is free and attractive category prizes are also at stake. puzzles, the prize for the best game after the end of each round and a convenient seating arrangement for accompanying professionals as well as quality food courts. For details and registration, players can visit the Official site.

    The Legacy of Shri Bishan Singh Ji

    The first V4 CHESS tournament is called Late. Shri Bishan Singh ji who was a prominent chess player, coach, national arbiter, APCA office holder and organizer. To promote a sport, you have to be passionate about it and the passion for the game of chess came naturally to Bishan Singh ji. Although he was a district champion, Bishan Singh ji knew that chess needed to be promoted to the level where it could be considered a career option for budding young talent. His work first started in Karimnagar, laying the foundation of the Karimnagar District Chess Association and eventually progressed to other districts in the state. He became the head of the AP State Chess Association in the early 90’s. He worked selflessly to make chess popular in the state. An example of this can be seen in his four sons whom he encouraged to play chess and they were all successful national level players and finished in the medal category several times at national championships. His sons take great pride in hosting his memorial tournament with his family and friends and furthering his legacy.

    Bishan Singh ji with his four sons from left to right: Jaspal Singh, Amithpal Singh, Rishpal Singh and Maninderpal Singh.

    His family has held state-level tournaments in his memory since 2017.

    An aerial view of the previous edition of the Sardar Bishan Singh ji Memorial State Rapid Chess Tournament held on December 25, 2021.

    Brochure and sponsors

    The V4 Chess Tournament Brochure was released by Mr. K.S. Prasad, Chairman of Telangana State Chess Association at a press conference on 17th October 2022 which was covered in all major newspapers and electronic media. TV5, one of the main regional electronic media, has agreed to be the media partner of this prestigious event.

    Press scenes gathered on October 17.

    From left to right: 1. Rishpal Singh, 2. Beenish Bhatia, 3. Kandi Ramu and 4. Amithpal Singh.

    When it comes to promoting chess, the four friends from Hyderabad stand strong and tall as the 4 pillars of Charminar and we wish them every success in their V4 CHESS – We are for Chess initiative.

    Players registered so far for the 1st Bishan Singh Ji Memorial All India Open FIDE Rating Chess Tournament:

    See the full list

    Important links

    Official site

    Tournament Details for 1st Bishan Singh Ji Memorial All India Open FIDE Rating Chess Tournament

    Tournament Details for 1st V4 Chess All India Open FIDE Rating Below 1600 Chess Tournament

    Event registration link


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    Fischer’s vision alive in Reykjavik: Abdusattorov, Carlsen at the top https://echecs-faciles.com/fischers-vision-alive-in-reykjavik-abdusattorov-carlsen-at-the-top/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 18:29:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/fischers-vision-alive-in-reykjavik-abdusattorov-carlsen-at-the-top/ On June 19, 1996, GM Bobby Fisherhoping to enhance the creative potential of chess, announced a variant he saw as the future of the game, Fischer Random. Twenty-six years later, on the 50th anniversary of his world championship victory in Reykjavik, the city where he won the title, Fischer’s vision is alive and well. The […]]]>

    On June 19, 1996, GM Bobby Fisherhoping to enhance the creative potential of chess, announced a variant he saw as the future of the game, Fischer Random. Twenty-six years later, on the 50th anniversary of his world championship victory in Reykjavik, the city where he won the title, Fischer’s vision is alive and well.

    The 2022 Fischer Random World Championship was loaded with creativity, dynamic gameplay, and lively competition. On one side of the dashboard is GM Nodirbek Abdusattorovan 18-year-old who has so far dominated some of the best players in the world in this imaginative variant, finishing top of Group A. On the other side is GM Magnus Carlsenthe classical chess world champion, finishing first in Group B.

    These two incredible competitors with GM Ian Nepomniachtchi and GM Hikaru NakamuraThe “second in their respective groups” will now meet for the knockout final, starting on Saturday.

    The knockout stage begins on October 29, from 8:00 a.m. PT / 5:00 p.m. CEST.

    Surprisingly, the first Fischer Random the starting position of the day was almost identical to the day before:

    Starting position for yesterday’s round three

    Starting position for today’s fifth round

    This gives players a rare opportunity to build on their understanding of similarities while creatively addressing slight differences.

    Here are the main features:

    • Each side has an undefended piece on the a column.
    • The king and d-rook start in a queenside castle-side position. If the d8 rook moves, the b8-a can jump over the king as queenside castling to replace him.
    • Bishops start near the center, which means they aim for the edges.
    • The differences from yesterday’s position are that the queen is in the corner, ready to aim for the longest diagonal, and the g8 knight starts on his usual square.
    • These changes bring the computer rating to +0.16, slightly closer to equal.

    Queens starting on the long diagonal seemed to accelerate the tactical nature of position in many games. Abdusattorov beat Nepomniachtchi in just 31 moves in a very dynamic game.

    This victory against his nearest competitor ensured the first place in Group A for Abdusattorovguaranteeing they will qualify for the knockout stage―with three games remaining.

    Abdusattorov finished the highest score between the two groups and swept world number three Nepomniachtchi twice. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

    The tactical game also dictated the finish to GM Vladimir Fedoseev against Carlsen. As the world champion pressed for a winning queen and rook finish, Fedoseev came up with a nifty trick.

    Even more shocking, GM so wesley against GM Hjorvar Gretarsson finished with mate on the board.

    With Abdusattorov’s own hand on the white pieces in the same position, we see an absolutely magical use of the rules of Fischer Random to reverse the situation.

    The starting position of the sixth round, the last for this stage, evoked similarities to the position of the fourth round with only the c-rook and the f-knight switched:

    Starting position for yesterday’s fourth round

    Starting position for today’s round six

    This change alone makes a big difference to the computer’s rating, which is +0.05the closest to equality we have seen in this phase. Here are the other main features:

    • There are no undefended pawns.
    • The king starts in a castle position next to the king. Will players castle kingside to jump the h-rook to the center or will they play h4/h5 to activate it?
    • Bishop a aims for the longest diagonal, signaling pawn b to move and open the bishop’s gaze to the enemy king on the other side of the board.
    • Commentators strongly favored 1.b4 or 1.b3 as possible first moves.

    How did these elite players choose to open the game? Try to guess Carlsen’s first move and Nakamura’s response:

    Check out the full game, from the wild opening to the incredible mid-game and late-game chess battles of our game of the day, Carlsen vs. Nakamura.

    I’m glad to have the chance to review Fischer Random games, a variant of chess that I love and would like to see become more popular. I already had the chance to play in two of these tournaments and I must say that I had a lot of fun in both cases. The first time was at the traditional Open tournament in Mainz, Germany, in 2006. The second time was in Reykjavik itself, in 2019, when I was invited to play in the Icelandic championship and that I even won the tournament. To this day, my friends find it hard to understand when I say that I was “Iceland’s Champion in Fischer Random”.

    This draw tied the game, securing the top two spots in Group B to Carlsen and Nakamura. The two rivals were tied on nine match points apiece, and Carlsen won on the tiebreaker, individual match points.

    Nakamura was the only player from either group to remain undefeated in all of their matches, winning three and drawing three. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com

    Unlike Carlsen and Nakamura, Nepomniachtchi and Gretarsson preferred to run the game in regular chess territory.

    With this victory, Nepomniachtchi secured second place in Group A.

    Although So narrowly missed out on qualifying for the next stage, finishing a match point behind Nepomniachtchi, the defending champion was the only player to earn a win over Abdusattorov in the entire round-robin.

    Final classification of the group stage


    Knockout bracket


    The Fischer Random World Championship, presented by the Icelandic government and the city of Reykjavik, brings together top players from around the world to compete in a series of classic Fischer Random games for their share of the $400,000 prize and the title of FIDE Fischer Random World Champion. Fischer Random (also known as Chess960) is a chess variant where all the standard chess rules are the same except for the starting position of the pieces, which can be in any of 960 semi-random configurations. Strongly endorsed by the 11th GM World Champion Bobby Fisherthe variant eschews the opening preparation to highlight the players’ true understanding of chess.


    Previous cover

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    Six NFL players with the highest IQ https://echecs-faciles.com/six-nfl-players-with-the-highest-iq/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 00:10:23 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/six-nfl-players-with-the-highest-iq/ As fans, we often forget how smart the average NFL player is when he hits the football field because we just want him to be on his way to winning games. Their intelligence is often underestimated and some of them have won college scholarships for their intelligence rather than their athletic skills. A player with […]]]>

    As fans, we often forget how smart the average NFL player is when he hits the football field because we just want him to be on his way to winning games. Their intelligence is often underestimated and some of them have won college scholarships for their intelligence rather than their athletic skills. A player with a football IQ and a high overall IQ will only benefit the teams he enrolls in the NFL. In this article, we’ll be looking at some NFL players with the highest IQ in the league, along with betting sites not on GamStop bring you this.

    Ryan Fitzpatrick – Washington Football Team (quarterback)

    Ryan Fitzpatrick, an NFL veteran, went to Harvard University to finish his college career. The Washington Football Team quarterback scored 1580 on the SAT and he scored 48/50 on the mandatory Wonderlic intelligence test for rookies entering the NFL.

    Richard Sherman – Free Agent (Cornerback)

    Richard Sherman, who claimed to be the “best corner in the league”, went to Stanford University and earned a 4.2 GPA in high school. In addition to playing football, Sherman earned his bachelor’s degree in communications and he earned his master’s in his final year of NCAA eligibility. Sherman founded a charitable foundation that helps low-income families purchase school supplies for academic success.

    Tom Brady – Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Quarterback)

    Everyone already knows how dangerous Tom Brady is to his opponents when he is on the pitch as he has a high football IQ. His intelligence can be used off the court as well, graduating from the University of Michigan with a bachelor’s degree in general studies. He also scored 33 on the Wonderlic test before entering the National Football League. Brady is also a well-known businessman having created the TB12Sports Lifestyle.

    Daniel Jones – New York Giants (Quarterback)

    Daniel Jones, who is the famous quarterback for the New York Giants team, had already started a college football career at Princeton University before attending Duke University to earn his bachelor’s degree in economics. While at Duke he wore a red shirt and played three successful seasons as a quarterback.

    John Urschel (retired)

    John Urschel is now an active former NFL player, but he should still be on this list. Urschel received a master’s degree in mathematics from Penn State, and it was noted that he taught many courses while attending Penn State, including analytic geometry, calculus, trigonometry, and many others. Besides that, he is also a professional chess player. He was awarded the William V. Campbell Trophy, an academic version of the Heisman. Urschel only spent three seasons with the Baltimore Ravens in the NFL before retiring so he could pursue his doctorate in mathematics at MIT. He scored 43/50 on the Wonderlic Test for incoming NFL players.

    Justin Herbert – Los Angeles Chargers (quarterback)

    Justin Herbert, who is one of the youngest players in the NFL, made this list when he graduated from the University of Oregon with a bachelor’s degree in biology. His intelligence earned him the William V. Campbell Award in 2019, which is only given to athletes who do well in athletics, academics and leadership.

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    Fischer random contest: guess the starting position and win prizes https://echecs-faciles.com/fischer-random-contest-guess-the-starting-position-and-win-prizes/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 11:17:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/fischer-random-contest-guess-the-starting-position-and-win-prizes/ Even if you don’t play in the 2022 Fischer Random World Championship finals, you can still have a chance to win prizes! The beauty of Fischer Random is in its name: the starting position is essentially random (with a few rules and settings to keep things playable and fair). This means players can start the […]]]>

    Even if you don’t play in the 2022 Fischer Random World Championship finals, you can still have a chance to win prizes!

    The beauty of Fischer Random is in its name: the starting position is essentially random (with a few rules and settings to keep things playable and fair). This means players can start the game in a variety of ways, 960 of them to be exact, leading to fascinating and unpredictable gameplay.

    How to win

    If you have a sixth sense or fancy a chess Nostradamus, we have the perfect contest for you: Simply set up your board in what looks like a realistic Fischer Random position, and submit your FEN using this form. If your position is played in the final match, you win!

    An example of a potential Fischer Random/Chess960 opening position.


    How to enter

    Creating your perfect Fischer Random Position is easy using the analysis function. To learn more about FEN, see here.

    • Configure the board as you wish here (be sure to follow the Chess960 guidelines below).
    • Once you are happy with your location, copy the FEN code. It should look something like this: bnnrkbqr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/BNNRKBQR w KQkq
    • Submit your FEN code (and Chess.com username, so we can contact you if you win) using the form below or by clicking the link here.
    • Be sure to submit your entry by October 25, 8 a.m. PT.

    Please note that there is a limit of one submission per person; if you submit multiple starting positions, only your first submission will be considered.

    To make things easier and faster, you are only allowed to submit one side of the board using the white pieces (because the other side will be mirrored).

    Price

    If your position is played in the final match: A one-year Diamond Membership.

    With four games played in the final game, that gives you a 4 in 960 (or 1 in 240) chance of guessing correctly.

    A Chess.com account is not required to participate but is required to be eligible for prizes.

    How to choose a Fischer Random/960 position?

    There are a few basic rules to keep in mind when setting up your board:

    • Pawns start where they should, but other pieces can be shuffled anywhere on the back rank.
    • White’s and Black’s minor and major pieces should be placed first and last respectively.
    • The position of White and Black must be reversed. For example, if the white queen is on a1, the black queen should be on a8.
    • The two bishops of each player must be placed on squares of opposite colors.
    • The king must be placed between the two rooks. This means that the king will never be on the a1 or h1 square for white and a8 or h8 for black.

    For more information, check out our Chess960 reference guide here.

    Be sure to submit your positions by October 25, 8 a.m. PT (the start of the tournament). We look forward to seeing your ideas!

    Note: This contest is void in all areas prohibited by state, municipal or federal law.


    Procedures for contacting and announcing winners and awarding prizes

    We will be in touch with the winners through messages on Chess.com or via the email provided in their submission.

    Contact will be made within one calendar week of the end of the contest.

    If prizes are distributed continuously throughout an event, contact will be made one week after the event ends.

    In contests where winners are randomly selected from chats on Twitch, YouTube, and Chess.com, everyone who answers correctly will be entered into a prize draw using software that will guarantee a selection. impartial and random winners.

    By participating in the event, you consent to Chess.com using your name/likeness for purposes of administration, awarding prizes, use in a publicly available list of winners and promotion of the event Chess.com related.

    NB: If you haven’t received any contact after a week, you can claim your prize by contacting support@chess.com.

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    Magnus Carlsen wins the Meltwater Champions Tour 2022 with an event to spare https://echecs-faciles.com/magnus-carlsen-wins-the-meltwater-champions-tour-2022-with-an-event-to-spare/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 21:14:30 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/magnus-carlsen-wins-the-meltwater-champions-tour-2022-with-an-event-to-spare/ Magnus Carlsen won the overall Meltwater Champions Chess Tour title for the second straight year – this time with an event to spare – after storming through the semi-finals at Aimchess Rapid. The Norwegian world number 1, who scored a hat-trick of tournament wins in the Tour’s penultimate event, picked up a $50,000 prize on […]]]>

    Magnus Carlsen won the overall Meltwater Champions Chess Tour title for the second straight year – this time with an event to spare – after storming through the semi-finals at Aimchess Rapid. The Norwegian world number 1, who scored a hat-trick of tournament wins in the Tour’s penultimate event, picked up a $50,000 prize on top of his overall earnings of $192,500 to date and the title of champion of the Tour 2022.

    Ahead of today’s quarter-finals, Polish ace Jan-Krzysztof Duda was the only player who could catch him but needed Indian teenager Arjun Erigaisi to knock Carlsen out and then win the final Major of the season in November.

    The 31-year-old had to work in the opener of his quarter-final match as Erigaisi played some of his best failures against the champion to get the pawns up and set up a seemingly easy victory. Carlsen, however, never gives up and opened his box full of endgame tricks to get back into the game. Erigaisi faltered under the pressure and after 137 moves Carlsen escaped with a draw.

    Carlsen, as he so often does, then took advantage of the Indian teenager’s dwindling confidence to follow it up with two landslide victories. This ensured Carlsen’s relatively smooth passage into the Aimchess semi-final – where the Tour champion and Duda will meet – and decided the 2022 Tour champion.

    Duda, playing from Krakow, dominated the preliminary round and took his form to the knockout stage also beating Indian opponent Vidit Gujrathi 2.5-0.5 with one game to spare.

    Duda said: “I wouldn’t call it easy, I think it was unexpected that I won the game in three games.”

    With Duda and Carlsen facing off in a semi-final, the other will be fought by Azerbaijani ace Shakhriyar Mamedyarov and Romanian number 1 Richard Rapport, both beating teenage prodigies.

    This meant that all teenagers were eliminated from the Aimchess Rapid.

    Rapport defeated Gukesh D who, like Erigaisi, picked up a win over Carlsen in the preliminary round. It took 167 shots for Rapport to triumph in an epic final match to keep his teenage opponent from a tiebreaker.

    Meanwhile, the experienced Mamedyarov knocked out the rapid world champion Nordibek Abdusattorov 2.5-0.5. For Gukesh and Abdusattorov, their journeys to the last eight have been hugely impressive.

    The semi-finals start tomorrow at 6:00 p.m. CEST. Every move will be streamed live and for free on chess24.com/tour and on the chess24 Twitch and YouTube channels.

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