Chess player – Echecs Faciles http://echecs-faciles.com/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 20:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://echecs-faciles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-80x80.png Chess player – Echecs Faciles http://echecs-faciles.com/ 32 32 Ukrainian grandmaster offers to overthrow Russian head of world chess body https://echecs-faciles.com/ukrainian-grandmaster-offers-to-overthrow-russian-head-of-world-chess-body/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/ukrainian-grandmaster-offers-to-overthrow-russian-head-of-world-chess-body/ KYIV, Ukraine – Russia’s war on Ukraine has permeated even the seemingly calm world of chess, where a Ukrainian grandmaster tries to overthrow the powerful Russian president of the International Chess Federation. Representatives of 195 member states are due to vote at a conference in Chennai, India, on Sunday for the president of the federation, […]]]>

KYIV, Ukraine – Russia’s war on Ukraine has permeated even the seemingly calm world of chess, where a Ukrainian grandmaster tries to overthrow the powerful Russian president of the International Chess Federation.

Representatives of 195 member states are due to vote at a conference in Chennai, India, on Sunday for the president of the federation, the world governing body for chess, which regulates all international championships, determines player ratings and decides where the world and continental championships will take place. The current president, Arkady V. Dvorkovich, a former Russian deputy prime minister, faces three challengers, including Andrii Baryshpolets, a 31-year-old Ukrainian grandmaster living in California.

His candidacy is an illustration of the attempt by many Ukrainians to untangle their country’s deep ties to Russia, as well as to challenge Moscow’s global influence, following the invasion of Ukraine in February.

“Certainly, the war pushed me to fight for changes at FIDE,” said Baryshpolets, using the French acronym by which the chess federation is commonly known.

“It’s a very non-transparent structure, and it’s been heavily dependent on Russian money and Russian sponsors,” said Baryshpolets, an economist who emigrated to the United States in 2016. He said the Russian government always used the chess federation to project Russia. cultural influence.

Baryshpolets pointed out that in 2020, the last year for which financial statements are available, Russian public and private companies provided more than 90% of all donations to FIDE, contributing more than 45% of the FIDE’s budget. organization.

Chess has traditionally been closely tied to the Russian state and a projection of its global power – a legacy of Soviet domination over the sport it funded and nurtured. From the establishment of the first International Chess Federation World Championship in 1948 until 1991, when the Soviet Union collapsed, Soviet players won all but one championship.

Dvorkovich, 50, was elected president four years ago, replacing eccentric Russian millionaire Kirsan N. Ilyumzhinov, whose scandalous two-decade reign ended with him being suspended by the federation’s ethics commission in 2018.

Dvorkovich said his close relationship with the Kremlin and Russian President Vladimir Putin was a thing of the past.

In an interview, Dvorkovich said he “understands the reputational risks” stemming from his previous affiliation with the Russian state. He described himself as “between the two fires”, criticized both in Russia for his refusal to openly support the war and abroad for his ties to the Kremlin.

In an online debate with other candidates for the organization’s presidency in July, he described himself as “far from the Kremlin” and pledged to resign if ever placed under sanctions by the ‘West. That same month, the head of the Russian Chess Federation called Dvorkovich “our candidate” and predicted that he would win easily.

Under Dvorkovich’s leadership, the federation condemned the Russian invasion of Ukraine and cut sponsorship ties with Russian-controlled businesses. After the invasion, Russian players were only able to participate in official international tournaments under the flag of another country or under the neutral FIDE flag.

Dvorkovich, however, echoed the Kremlin’s false claims that he is fighting fascism in Ukraine.

At the same time, he is generally well regarded for his leadership of FIDE, and he remains popular among chess powerhouses like India and the dozens of smaller national federations that depend on grants from a special development fund of the FIDE to work.

“Compared to four years ago, today’s FIDE is completely different,” said British Chess Magazine editor Milan Dinic, referring to the changes he said Dvorkovich had made. “He is much more respected both inside and outside the chess world, and his finances have improved and become more transparent,” he added, while acknowledging that the organization had still need more changes.

Baryshpolets learned to play chess when he was 6 years old, and he was playing tournaments when he was 8 years old. Speaking from his home in Los Angeles, he said his campaign platform included promoting transparency in the way tournament venues, including many in Russia, are held. , are rewarded.

“A big concern that the federations also see is that what is happening inside this black box is not transparent and clear, why certain decisions have been made as they are,” he said. .

Baryshpolets campaigned low-key, meeting delegates in Chennai and taking a regular shuttle bus to the scene. Each national federation has a single vote by secret ballot to elect the president, an unpaid post.

One country that will not support him, it seems, is Ukraine: its federation has backed another candidate. India appear to have lined up behind Dvorkovich, both in the person of Viswanathan Anand, a former world champion running on the Russian’s ticket, and in their gratitude for Dvorkovich’s help in securing the Moved Chess Olympiad, a major event with 3,000 players and hundreds of delegates, to Chennai.

The United States Chess Federation said in a statement from Executive Director Carol Meyer that it has not decided which ticket to support and will wait to hear from its delegation after meeting with all of the candidates for Chennai.

Lev Alburt, a former Ukrainian chess champion who defected to the United States in 1979 while playing for the Soviet Union, said that if war meant the chess world lost support from major Russian donors , he thought this could be offset by other emerging chess nations with deep pockets.

“In the Arab world, for example,” he said, “the UAE is a big sponsor of chess, and the Saudis are becoming big supporters.”

Alburt said he views the challenge of world chess as only a small part of the fallout from the war between Ukraine and Russia.

“The world at large is in danger of freezing, like a new cold war,” he said. “And in such a situation, it would be difficult to keep the chess world together.”

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The best chess books to buy in 2022 https://echecs-faciles.com/the-best-chess-books-to-buy-in-2022/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 08:48:23 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/the-best-chess-books-to-buy-in-2022/ Beginner chess players understand the level of concentration required to perform very important opening moves. They might also notice that other more experienced players don’t seem to value their openings as much as they might think. Why? Probably because they are following a strategy that they have spent hours studying and testing over and over […]]]>

Beginner chess players understand the level of concentration required to perform very important opening moves. They might also notice that other more experienced players don’t seem to value their openings as much as they might think. Why? Probably because they are following a strategy that they have spent hours studying and testing over and over again on the board.

In chess, the opening moves are crucial, but there are also golden rules and secrets that, when followed, can make you a much better competitor. Chess players need to think about an attack strategy, as well as focus on defending their pieces and not making mistakes that will cause them to lose their big pieces.

If you don’t have a chess book (or mentor) to teach you these things, you won’t be able to take your chess playing skills to the next level, even if you’re already a social chess player. advanced. Picking up a good chess book will help you unlock new levels and progress faster, breaking down some strategies and teaching you the tips and tricks you need to master the game.

READ NEXT: Our favorite board games for dating, parties and dating


Best chess books: at a glance


How to Choose the Best Chess Book

When choosing the best chess book, there are two main things to consider: your current level of chess knowledge and your preferred learning style.

What level of chess player are you?

The purpose of a chess book is to teach you new tricks, so you will want to get a book that suits your learning needs and current level. There’s no point in getting a book aimed at complete beginners if you’ve been playing chess for a while.

Most chess books will be aimed at a certain level of chess player and it will be quite clear whether a particular book would suit you. Levels can range from complete beginner to advanced, and some books even indicate what chess rating readers should ideally have to fully grasp the information in a particular book. Therefore, when buying a chess book, it is essential to first assess your skill level.

Chess is quite a complex game, but sometimes reading about it can seem even more complicated. Many chess books use chess notation to explain strategies and theories, so it would be advisable to familiarize yourself with this before delving into a theory book. A chess book is meant to help you, not overwhelm you, so it’s always good to be honest with yourself about your level, and maybe aim for a beginner’s book if you prefer that. it is broken down in simple terms.

Which learning style suits you best?

Another thing to consider before choosing one of these books is which learning style is right for you. A book written for a child, for example, will be worded very differently from a book intended for adults. Chess can be quite difficult to learn from a book for those who are more visual learners, and in those cases a chess puzzle book with lots of diagrams and examples would probably be best.

Others will learn effectively by reading a lot of theory texts and so will be fine with some of the books that just look at strategies and delve into the thought processes of world famous chess players.

READ NEXT: Think bigger with the best puzzles for kids and adults

The best chess book to buy in 2022

1. Bobby Fischer teaches chess by Bobby Fischer: The best overall chess book

Price: From £6 | Buy now on Amazon

This chess book was not only written by a grandmaster and the 11th world chess champion, but by a real teacher. Bobby Fischer, a chess prodigy at just 14, wrote this book with the learner in mind. He ensured that whatever the reader absorbs can be easily absorbed and applied in practice, using a learning technique called “programmed instruction”.

The book walks readers step-by-step through small pieces of information and questions called “frames.” These frames ask the reader to provide a yes or no answer, which can then be compared to the answers. At the end, readers can flip the book over and continue working backwards, discovering all-new matting moves that can be applied in their next playthrough. The book is extremely well thought out and perfect for those who want to up their game.

Key Specs – Format: Paperback, library binding; Editor: Bantam United States; Number of pages: 179

2. How to Reassess Your Chess: Chess Mastery Through Imbalances by Jeremy Silman: The Best Alternative Chess Book

Price: £24 | Buy now on Amazon

Jeremy Silman, another well-known international chess master, designed this book to help avid chess players reach master level. It’s considered a modern classic and is recommended for intermediate and advanced players (a novice would probably struggle to keep up). It is mainly for those who already have a good understanding of the basics of chess and understand the three phases of the game: early, mid game and late game.

In this book, Silman focuses primarily on his concept of “chess imbalances”, often referred to as Silman’s thinking technique. It explains in detail the basics of imbalances and ensures that each aspect is learned by the reader, which will help him to take it to the next level. It’s always nice when teachers add a little fun to their teaching, and How to reassess your failures was written with humor and rich instructional language, making it both an easy-to-follow and informative read.

Key Specs – Format: Pin; Editor: Silman James Press; Number of pages: 658

3. Catastrophes & Tactics in the Chess Opening by Carsten Hansen: The Best Chess Book for Winning Quickly

Price: From £2 | Buy now on Amazon

If you are a player who wants to progress quickly, this book may be the best tool to get you there. In Disasters and tactics, Carsten Hansen walks readers through the many tactics that could help you win a game of chess very quickly. In just 15 moves or less, you could learn how to checkmate your opponent with the secrets provided by the author. It can certainly create a sensational effect when a game of chess is won as soon as it opens – and this book will show you how many of the best players of the last 150 years have done so.

Hansen takes readers through seven different openings and defensive strategies as he examines a collection of plays that were all finished in just 15 moves. Gaffes, errors and good chess tactics are analyzed in each game. The book is designed for those who already have a good level of skill and a solid understanding of chess notation. To get the most out of this book, it helps to play some of the games on a physical chess board.

Key Specs – Format: Paperback, Kindle; Editor: Independently published; Number of pages: 178

4. Chess for Kids: How to Play and Win by Richard James: The Best Chess Book for Kids

Price: £4 | Buy now on Amazon

If your child has taken an interest in chess, chances are you have a little genius in the making. Chess is a fantastic way to develop a child’s brain and help their memory and concentration. It’s also a good way to help them solve problems, which will definitely come in handy later in life. This chess book could make the perfect gift for their next birthday and could even inspire them or give them the confidence to take part in competitions and take their hobby further.

Author, Richard James, has been teaching chess to children since the 1970s and wrote this book specifically for children (recommended for ages seven or older). It first breaks down the basic rules of the game, which is always helpful for beginners, and then, using a pair of fictional characters battling aliens in a game of chess, makes learning strategies fun and engaging.

Key Specs – Format: Paperback, Kindle; Editor: The right way; Number of pages: 192

5. The Ultimate Chess Puzzle Book by John Emms: The best chess puzzle book

Price: From £8 | Buy now on Amazon

If you are more of a visual learner, this puzzle book is the perfect chess learning book for you. Sometimes there’s no better way to learn than by actually visualizing what you’re reading – and, more importantly, by practicing. This book contains 200 puzzles, with diagrams of chess boards at different times in a game, and challenges readers to solve the puzzle by determining what would be the most favorable or “correct” move according to the theories and strategies discussed at the start of the game. the book.

It is suitable for everyone from beginners to advanced chess players, as the first 100 puzzles are relatively simple. The next 100 are extremely difficult and would challenge even the best chess players. The author, John Emms, is an experienced trainer and chess grandmaster, so a few lessons from him are sure to help and prepare you for your next chess game or tournament.

Key Specs – Format: Paperback, Kindle; Editor: Gambit Publications Ltd; Number of pages: 240

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Iconic chess rivalries that kept the world hooked for decades https://echecs-faciles.com/iconic-chess-rivalries-that-kept-the-world-hooked-for-decades/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 17:03:36 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/iconic-chess-rivalries-that-kept-the-world-hooked-for-decades/ The 44th Chess Olympiad has generated a lot of interest in India, home to 67 grandmasters and a culture hungry for indoor sports like chess. The Olympiad started in Mamallapuram, Tamil Nadu on July 28 and will end on August 10. This is the first time India has hosted the event. The Olympiad has already […]]]>

The 44th Chess Olympiad has generated a lot of interest in India, home to 67 grandmasters and a culture hungry for indoor sports like chess. The Olympiad started in Mamallapuram, Tamil Nadu on July 28 and will end on August 10. This is the first time India has hosted the event.


The Olympiad has already given rise to some trying matches. Competition shapes the spirit of sport. But no rivalry seems to hold as much intrigue and political message as some of the battles between two chess masters, memorialized in a string of Hollywood films, pop culture and Cold War legends. Here’s a look at some of the most competitive player rivalries and matches that have sparked public interest.

Spassky-Fischer: Rivalry in the Cold War Era

After World War II, the first World Chess Championship was organized by the International Chess Federation (FIDE) in 1948. Until 1972, the Soviet Union remained the dominant name in the sport, producing a champion of the world after another, starting with Mikhail Botvinnik. to Boris Spassky. In 1972, however, Spassky, who was known to be a Russian patriot but critical of Soviet politics, was defeated by American chess genius Robert James Fischer in the Match of the Century. The historic match, which took place at the height of Cold War tensions and the controversial Vietnam War, has been endorsed by the United States as a symbol of America’s and the Western bloc’s growing influence. It was the first time that the Americans won the title of world champion of the Russian school of chess. Speaking about the match in a 2016 interview, Garry Kasparov, who was nine at the time of the match, called Spassky’s loss “a great intellectual victory for the United States, and you know, an extremely painful, almost insulting loss for Soviet Union”. Union, because Bobby Fischer was a great player but he was like a lone warrior. A guy from Brooklyn taking on the powerful Soviet chess school. It also led to the boom in chess as a serious and popular sport in the United States.

Anand-Kramnik: the struggle between India and Russia

Indian chess prodigy Viswanathan Anand has a long-standing rivalry with Russian chess master Vladimir Kramnik. The duo played 93 classic chess games, of which the two won 11 games each, while 71 ended in a draw. Anand has won 12 matches in the rapid format while Kramnik has won four. But in the Blitz format, Kramnik evened out the difference with eight wins to Anand’s five. Anand won the 2008 World Chess Championship after defeating Kramnik. Their scores have always been neck and neck, so close that it’s been hard to pick the best player. A web series titled “The Finish Line” recently quoted Anand as saying, “Over the 20 odd years, we traded position number 2-3. We were always very close to each other in terms of points, so close that when he retired our scores were absolutely identical even after more than 150 games.

Kasparov vs. Deep Blue: Man vs. Machine

Any list of iconic chess rivalries would be incomplete without a mention of the futuristic rivalry between Kasparov and Deep Blue, a supercomputer created by IBM. The six-game series took place over the years 1996-97, which eventually became a symbolic metaphor for man’s relationship with technology and the changing world of AI, a precursor to the present and future of artificial intelligence. The first game was played in Philadelphia. Kasparov won 4–2. However, Deep Blue won the second game, marking the first time a reigning human chess master had been defeated by a computer.

Kasparov vs. Karpov: Nemesis

The rivalry between Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov is part of Soviet legend and myth, brimming with scandal and controversy and often touted as one of the most hostile rivalries in the chess world. The antagonism between educated Soviet poster artist Karpov and rebellious refugee Kasparov, which lasted from 1984 to 1991, was explosive. It captured global interest at a time when the Cold War had left the world divided between two dominant political blocs, and chess was seen as a sign and symbol of higher intellect, which helped legitimize ideologies policies.

The height of the rivalry was on display in the 1984-85 Chess Championship match between the nemesis. The first round of the match lasted five months, after which it was abandoned. Although the circumstances of the game’s sudden end remain unclear, Karpov led Kasparov five wins to three. The match was replayed in 1985. Kasparov was 22 at the time and won the rematch against his rival, who was 12 years older.

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Elo Rating: How it Works to Evaluate Chess Scores and Player Performance https://echecs-faciles.com/elo-rating-how-it-works-to-evaluate-chess-scores-and-player-performance/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 19:23:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/elo-rating-how-it-works-to-evaluate-chess-scores-and-player-performance/ If you play or follow chess, chances are you’ve come across the term Elo rating. Simply put, it is a dynamic rating system used in chess to calculate the ability of players and compare them. What is the Elo Rating System The Elo rating system is a mechanism devised by Hungarian-American physicist and chess player […]]]>

If you play or follow chess, chances are you’ve come across the term Elo rating. Simply put, it is a dynamic rating system used in chess to calculate the ability of players and compare them.

What is the Elo Rating System

The Elo rating system is a mechanism devised by Hungarian-American physicist and chess player Arpad Elo to determine the ratings of chess players.

Initially, the system was not based on an absolute score, but on the possible results of the matches and the difference in quality of the two players.

Later, the system was also used by other sports, including basketball. Incidentally, even the modern dating app Tinder used the rating system for a while.

Currently, FIDE, the governing body of chess, uses a variant of the Elo rating to give players a score.

What system does FIDE use?

The whole premise of the point system is based on the quality difference between two players. The point mechanism, due to the nature of its mathematical calculations, favors lower rated opponents as they are less likely to win over higher rated opponents who will be favorites to win.

For example: If two players A and B, with Elo ratings of 2700 and 2300, respectively, face each other, the points offered for B’s victory will be higher than what A will get for a victory.

For those who love math, the advantage for a lower rated player is given for two reasons:

The first parameter

The first is the probability of winning. Since the probability of winning is lower for lower-rated players, the difference between an actual win (whose result is 1) and the probability of winning is higher.

Example: In a contest between players A and B mentioned above, A’s probability of winning is 0.92 while B’s probability of winning is 0.08. This is obtained by using a complex formula based on the rating difference, which in the case of A and B is 400. Therefore, the rating change for B’s victory will be 1 – 0.08 = 0.92

The second parameter

The second point of advantage for lower rated players is the adjustment factor. The adjustment factor, also known as the K-factor, is used to give younger/newer players an advantage. The adjustment factor is multiplied by the rating change (calculated above) and added to the original rating. The K factor is usually 40 for a newly rated player who has played less than 30 rated games. The value of the K factor is 20 for a player with a rating lower than 2400, while it is 10 for a player with a higher rating.

Continuing with the example above, the change in B’s rating after a win, assuming K is 20, will be 20 X 0.92 = 18.4. The change will however be rounded to 18.

What else

Another key factor is that the rating system used by FIDE follows zero-sum game theory. This means that the points gained by the winning player would mean an equal loss of points for the losing player. Thus, player A will lose 18 points in a loss against player B.

Importance of the Chess Rating System

The Elo rating is used to determine the strength of chess players, and thus titles such as Grandmaster, International Master, and FIDE Master are awarded after players reach a certain level.

The scoring system is designed in such a way as to prevent a single player from taking a substantial point lead. This is because the higher rated player will have a higher probability of winning and therefore an actual win will yield fewer points.

In turn, a loss, or even a draw, to a lower-rated opponent will result in a greater points deduction and possibly reduce any significant advantage.

Players with the highest Elo rating

Magnus Carlsen holds the record for the highest Elo rating achieved at 2882. The Norwegian reached this level in 2014. Carlsen, currently, has a rating of 2864 and still on top.

Chess legend Garry Kasparov is the only other player to break the 2850 mark. Indian chess icon Viswanathan Anand is among 14 players to break the 2800 mark. 2022, only Carlsen and China’s Ding Liren have a rating above 2800.

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Lion and his strategy | ChessBase https://echecs-faciles.com/lion-and-his-strategy-chessbase/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 06:07:28 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/lion-and-his-strategy-chessbase/ He fights like a lion, they say. So it should be the pinnacle of martial arts. On the other hand, if you examine a specimen of this enormous and magnificent feline in a zoo or a desert documentary, you will notice that it sits yawning, enjoying the sun or the view of its harem, scratching […]]]>

He fights like a lion, they say. So it should be the pinnacle of martial arts.

On the other hand, if you examine a specimen of this enormous and magnificent feline in a zoo or a desert documentary, you will notice that it sits yawning, enjoying the sun or the view of its harem, scratching here and there, and pay attention to restful sleep.

Fabiano Caruana, with his soothing and light voice, has little in common with a roaring lion. Nevertheless, hardly any other player has the board so well under control, like the American Super Grandmaster | Photo: David Llada

Navigating the Ruy Lopez Vol.1-3

The Ruy Lopez is one of the oldest openings that continues to enjoy great popularity from club level to the absolute world top. In this series of videos, American super GM Fabiano Caruana, speaking to IM Oliver Reeh, lays out a full repertoire for White.

To be honest, the Leo star sign isn’t necessarily the most aggressive sign in the zodiac. In fact, he doesn’t like fighting very much. A typical Aries is easily provoked and enjoys a good fight whenever he comes along; Scorpio, who is passionate and deep, wants to destroy their “enemies” (who or whatever made them so); Libra, Sagittarius, and Aquarius like to fight for what’s right and are capable of being quite violent when necessary.

Leo exudes a royal ease and prefers to let others engage in conflict before taking the initiative. He is a born monarch and is good at delegation. Only these big cats of their breed engage in group hunting. Simply put, the boss sends his females first. (We will see the lionesses later.)

Mikhail Botvinnik – Leo’s only world champion, played on top of the world for decades. The last world champions Karpov, Kasparov and Kramnik were educated at the Botvinnik chess school.

It would be misleading to assume that just because he is lounging, he is not interested or even focused. The Lion is in control. The commander’s mound is where he is, not a place on the sidelines. He does so without hesitation if he decides it is necessary to lend his strength in battle. He always shows bravery.

Leos throughout world history, including Fidel Castro on August 13, Deng Xiaoping on August 22, Benito Mussolini on July 29, and most importantly, Napoleon Bonaparte on August 15, demonstrate that this zodiac sign generates effective strategists. (No one said any of them were very endearing.) They were responsible whether you called them geniuses or despots.

Napoleon Bonaparte I is already known to chess players, as his games were integrated into the first ChessBase discs. | Photo: Pixabay

Incidentally, Napoleon enjoyed playing chess when his plans for world conquest allowed, which was infrequent and with equally poor results. At least there is ‘Napoleon’s Attack’, which immediately puts the queen in play on f3. (See: a lion first sends his lionesses into battle. But we’ll get to that…)

Some games with comrades in arms have been passed down. The Duke of Bassano, for example, judged: “The Emperor was not good at openings in a game of chess. From the very beginning, he often lost pieces and pawns, but his opponents did not dare to take advantage of this. inspired until mid-game; the confusion of rooms stimulated his intelligence; he predicted more than three or four moves and produced elegant and clever combinations. »

However, the beautiful and clever combinations were not enough to defeat the “so-called” automatic “Turkish”. After the fourteenth move, the queen of the great emperor was already lost.

So how does someone born between July 23 and August 22 play chess? And how to defend against it effectively? He basically displays a strong and focused demeanor. Don’t be fooled if he seems a bit sleepy – he rarely makes mistakes. Under pressure, or when there are problems with the weather, his eyes become more alert. Now this could get dangerous…

Vugar Gashimov was probably on his way to becoming one of the best chess players in the world. Sadly, we never found out, as he passed away in January 2014 from his illness.| Photo: Nadja Wittmann

His legendary end of round against Daniel Stellwagen is unrivalled! Comments by Vugar Gashimov

And now we finally come to the Lionesses!

The very strong Viktorija Čmilytė-Nielsen, *August 6, is one of them, the super-discovery Tania Sachdev, *August 20 too – but above all the royal Judit Polgar,*July 23. Her father experimented a bit with his three smart daughters: how long does it take to study something to achieve mastery? Susan and Sofia, Aries and Scorpio, became international champions and female grandmasters (Susan World Champion 1996 to 1999).

(fl) Sisters Polgar Susan, Judit and Sofia | Photo: Susan Polgar on Twitter

Judit, the youngest of the sisters and a real lioness, *July 23, became the strongest woman in chess history. The only one to date to have reached the top 10 of the world (general) ranking. She started going exclusively to men’s events quite early and frequently. In July 2005, she reached 8th place in the world rankings.

In 1993, she knocked former world champion Karpov off the board in a quick game. In 2002, she did the same against Garry Kasparov, who amused himself by remarking on the modest cognitive limits of women. World-class player Nigel Short has lost to her several times and said appreciatively, “She’s a killer and can smell a mate 20 moves ahead.”

Bobby Fischer, who at the age of nineteen said: “All women are stupid compared to men, women shouldn’t play chess, they lose all games against a man” – the Polgar family had a friendly relationship for a while when he hid in their house in 1993 because his home country was brandishing an arrest warrant. At that time, he was playing with the Polgar sisters and analyzing matches with them. But shortly before a reported blitzkrieg against Judit took place, Fischer got into an argument with her father and called off the match.

ChessBase Magazine #204 has a special on Judit Polgar, where CBM writers comment on their favorite games from the great Hungarian.

After all, the lioness had pushed him from the throne of the youngest defending champion in 1991; Bobby Fischer became a grandmaster at the age of 15 years and four months – Judit succeeded a month younger…

Famous Lion Chess Personalities + Birthdays:

Polgar, Judit – July 23, 1976
Gashimov, Vugar – July 24, 1986
Hodgson, Julian M. – July 25, 1963
From Firmian, Nick – July 26, 1957
Caruana, Fabian – July 30, 1992
Cori, Jorge – July 30, 1995
Davies, Nigel R. – July 31, 1960
Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter – August 1, 1976
Wang Hao – August 4, 1989
Pfleger, Helmut – August 6, 1943
Čmilytė, Viktorija – August 6, 1983
Praggnanandhaa R – August 10, 2005
Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan – August 11, 1982
Maghsoodloo, Parham – August 11, 2000
Kotov, Alexander – August 12, 1913
Adhiban B. – August 15, 1992
Pruijssers, Roeland – August 16, 1989
Botvinnik, Mikhail – August 17, 1911
Rogozenco, Dorian – August 18, 1973
Zvjaginsev, Vadim – August 18, 1976
Vallejo Pons, Francisco – August 21, 1982

Leo has his own opening – The Black Lion. GM Simon Williams took the interesting opening, and it’s getting more and more played!

The Black Lion — an aggressive version of the Philidor Defense

Looking for an interesting, exciting, aggressive and flexible opening to play against 1 e4!? Then the Black Lion is for you! The Lion prepares to roar after 1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e5 4.Nf3 Nbd7 5.Bc4 Be7 6.0–0 c6 – and now Black wants to attack with a …g5 start. Grandmaster Simon Williams suggests a simple-to-learn, but deadly system of development for blacks. He explains the main ideas of this opening in a simple and entertaining way, using examples from maverick players such as Baadur Jobava. In what other opening do you have a chance to attack White’s castling king with a …g5 start? Let the Lion roar and the fun begins!

Connections:

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How the Islamic world embraced, rejected, then embraced chess again https://echecs-faciles.com/how-the-islamic-world-embraced-rejected-then-embraced-chess-again/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 17:23:14 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/how-the-islamic-world-embraced-rejected-then-embraced-chess-again/ Are chess ‘haram’ and ‘un-Islamic’? For a brief time fundamentalist Islamic “scholars” – from the Sunni and Shia camps – ruled that this was the case and banned the game. The grand mufti of Saudi Arabia, Sheikh Abdulaziz al-Sheikh, once stated that chess was forbidden in Islam, claiming that it encouraged play and was a […]]]>

Are chess ‘haram’ and ‘un-Islamic’? For a brief time fundamentalist Islamic “scholars” – from the Sunni and Shia camps – ruled that this was the case and banned the game. The grand mufti of Saudi Arabia, Sheikh Abdulaziz al-Sheikh, once stated that chess was forbidden in Islam, claiming that it encouraged play and was a waste of time. And Iraq’s top Shia religious authority, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, has also issued rulings banning chess. Iranian clerics banned playing chess in public after the 1979 Islamic Revolution, saying it was haram.

Fortunately, this phase has passed and today the Islamic world has several top players, little more exciting than the Iranian Alireza Firouzja, currently the third player in the world, although he took French nationality last year after a break with the Iranian chess federation which did not want him to play against Israelis. Today, the FIDE top 100 features several players of the Islamic faith, including Azerbaijani Shakhriyar Mamedyarov at No. 12, Uzbek Nodirbek Abdusattorov at No. 46, and the rising Saleh Salem of the United Arab Emirates at No. 53 .

In fact, one of the most uplifting things about the ongoing Chess Olympiad outside Chennai is that every Islamic world is taking part, despite the presence of Israel, except of course of Pakistan, who withdrew just before the opening citing the Olympiad torch relay crossing Kashmir. .

Of course, converts (in any religion) can always be trusted to be more extreme in displaying faith and piety than the originals. A few years ago, when cricketer Mohammed Kaif shared a photo of himself playing chess with his young son on social media, he was attacked by worshipers in the subcontinent, one who told him “Kaif bhai ye khel haram hai”, while another advised him to teach his son “deen aur quran”. Kaif’s elegant response: “Thekeedar ji se poochiye, breathe haraam or not.”

Indeed, Kashmir is at the heart of the chess story – a smarter Pakistan could have claimed chess, but they would claim Kashmir instead. A small problem with this is that chess predates Islam. One version of his origin is that he was born in Kashmir as “chaturanga” – where the shatranj world comes from. Most chess historians agree that it was then taken to Persia, where it became part of the princely or courtly education of the Persian nobility, and then went to Europe with Islamic conquests before return to India, becoming very popular among the Muslim elites.

Indeed, for centuries, chess has been central to the Muslim ethos of the subcontinent. This was best exemplified in Munshi Premchand’s classic 1924 story Shatranj ke Khiladi, brought to cinematic life by the great Satyajit Ray. It is unclear whether Premchand was aware of the Mir Sultan Khan and his exploits (more soon on India’s greatest chess player before Vishy Anand), which only gained international recognition in the period 1929-1933. But the nobles of Awadh, where the story of Premchand is set, and other principalities, were evidently inundated with gambling even when the Bahadurs Company arrived.

Among them was a Muslim overlord of Sargodha (in present-day Pakistan) named Colonel Nawab Sir Umar Hayat Khan Tiwana, who recognized the promise of early failures in his squire (stable boy) named Mir Sultan Khan. Vigorously promoting the illiterate young boy, the Nawab unleashed him on the European circuit in the late 1920s, causing a stir. Barely literate and only then familiarizing himself with Western systems and notations, the young Khan stunned the best players of his generation, winning three British Open crowns, chess’ era equivalent of Wimbledon.

An underrated accompaniment to Mir Sultan Khan’s story: Sir Hayat Khan’s servant Fatima also won the women’s British Open title in 1933. Dig into that, you orthodox fools. It wasn’t just Muslim men, Muslim women also played chess. Imagine a Muslim Indian making a splash in London some 85 years before the Indian women’s cricket team hit the headlines.

Khan’s exploits were widely reported in the media at this time, including in The Times of India in 1935, when he arrived in Bombay for a simultaneous chess display at a club on Tamarind Lane in Fort. Thereafter, he began to fade from public view, disappearing completely in the mid-1950s when Sargodha, his hometown, traveled to Pakistan, where his body, fame and reputation lie buried. But in his heyday he was a subject of immense curiosity and admiration among his contemporaries.



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Chess players praise Chess Olympiad preparations in Chennai https://echecs-faciles.com/chess-players-praise-chess-olympiad-preparations-in-chennai/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 09:16:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/chess-players-praise-chess-olympiad-preparations-in-chennai/ India is hosting the 44th edition of the Chess Olympiad, which will start on July 28 at the Four Points by Sheraton Mahabalipuram Resort and Convention Center in Mahabalipuram, near Chennai in Tamil Nadu. As the coveted tournament kicks off on Thursday, teams from different countries around the world have already reached Mahabalipuram for the […]]]>

India is hosting the 44th edition of the Chess Olympiad, which will start on July 28 at the Four Points by Sheraton Mahabalipuram Resort and Convention Center in Mahabalipuram, near Chennai in Tamil Nadu. As the coveted tournament kicks off on Thursday, teams from different countries around the world have already reached Mahabalipuram for the Chess Olympiad 2022. Meanwhile, the city of Chennai has been heavily decked and decorated for the mega event , which left chess players amazed.

On Wednesday, chess promoter David Llada took to his official Twitter account and posted a tweet expressing his joy at having reached the site of the Chess Olympiad. In particular, he pointed out that India has become his new favorite country in the world, out of a total of 61 countries he has visited so far. He also mentioned that he had experienced incredible hospitality from his hosts since arriving in the country.

“Now India is officially my favorite country in the world – out of the 61 I have visited. I have to say I am privileged to have experienced incredible hospitality in most places I have visited. I went. But the people here, they open their hearts to you like nowhere else,” David Llada said.

AICF President Dr Sanjay Kapoor responds

Meanwhile, David received a response from Indian Chess Federation (AICF) President Dr Sanjay Kapoor who said the tweet made his day. “David, your tweet has just made every #Indians day, especially the @AICFchess team and all the volunteers who are currently on duty to ensure that all players and visitors have a similar experience to yours. Welcome to the #ChessOlympiad in #India!” Kapoor said.

Spanish chess grandmaster Francisco Vallejo Pons also took to his Twitter account and hailed the arrangements made in Chennai for the 44th Olympiad. He shared a photo of the Chess Olympiad hall and said, “This looks like the best Chess Olympiad hall ever! #ChessOlympiad2022.”

“We were so warmly welcomed by all Indians,” says Kevin Hogy

German Chess Sports Director Kevin Hogy also shared details of the hospitality he received after arriving in India. “Both @Schachbund teams for @FIDE_chess #ChessOlympiad arrived at the stunning Kaldan Samudhra Palace. We were so warmly welcomed by all Indians, hotel staff and @aicfchess. Thank you for an unforgettable day 1! We look forward to looking forward to the first round,” Hogy said.

British Grandmaster David Howell also expressed his thoughts on Twitter and said, “We were very well received in Chennai! #chess #olympiad2022″. At the same time, American chess player Tatev Abrahamyan said, “I have arrived in Chennai! Looking forward to a great Olympiad for the USA team! #ChessOlympiad2022 #ChennaiChess2022 “.

(Image: @aicfchess/@DavidHowellGM/Twitter/@chennaichess22/Instagram)

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Robot chess player breaks 7-year-old opponent’s finger https://echecs-faciles.com/robot-chess-player-breaks-7-year-old-opponents-finger/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 00:27:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/robot-chess-player-breaks-7-year-old-opponents-finger/ A robot chess player broke his 7-year-old opponent’s finger during a match at a tournament in Russia. The boy was facing the robot when he grabbed and broke the child’s finger by mistake at the Moscow Open last week, according to Russian local media. “The robot broke the child’s finger – this, of course, is […]]]>

A robot chess player broke his 7-year-old opponent’s finger during a match at a tournament in Russia.

The boy was facing the robot when he grabbed and broke the child’s finger by mistake at the Moscow Open last week, according to Russian local media.

“The robot broke the child’s finger – this, of course, is bad,” said Moscow Chess Federation President Sergey Lazarev. says TASS Thursday.

The child reportedly made his next move on the chessboard before the robot – a large automated arm powered by artificial intelligence – had time to recalculate and mistake the boy’s finger for a chess piece, according to Lazarev.

“The kid made a move, and after that we have to give the robot time to respond, but the boy rushed over, the robot grabbed him,” he told the outlet in Russian.

Footage of the incident released by the Baza Telegram Channel shows the mechanical arm clinging to the boy’s finger for several seconds before the adults intervene and are able to remove it from his hand.

The young chess player, whose name is Christopher according to Baza, returned to the tournament the next day and finished his matches with a cast around his finger, Lazarev said.

The boy was facing the robot when he grabbed and mistakenly broke the child’s finger at the Moscow Open last week.
Telegram

Christopher is one of the top 30 under-9 chess players in Moscow, Baza reported.

The robot – which Lazarev says has been used in numerous chess tournaments – was hired by the organization for the Moscow Chess Open and has the ability to play multiple matches simultaneously.

“We have nothing to do with the robot,” Lazarev said. “Robot operators, apparently, will have to think about tightening the protection so that this situation does not happen again.”

Sergey Smagin, vice-president of the Russian Chess Federation, told Baza that the robot’s misfires are unprecedented as far as he knows.

“There are certain safety rules and the child apparently violated them. When he made his move, he didn’t realize he had to wait first,” Smagin said. “This is an extremely rare case, the first I can remember.”

The child’s parents reportedly contacted the prosecution, according to TASS.

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Keeping the Ukrainian team in good spirits during the Chess Olympiad is a challenge: Sulypa | Chess News https://echecs-faciles.com/keeping-the-ukrainian-team-in-good-spirits-during-the-chess-olympiad-is-a-challenge-sulypa-chess-news/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 17:26:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/keeping-the-ukrainian-team-in-good-spirits-during-the-chess-olympiad-is-a-challenge-sulypa-chess-news/ CHENNAI: When Ukrainian grandmaster Oleksandr Sulypa posted a photo of himself holding a gun earlier this year as Russian troops invaded the country, the 50-year-old instantly became a symbol of resistance across the world. Her resilience has been praised on various social media platforms. After serving at a military base in the western Ukrainian city […]]]>
CHENNAI: When Ukrainian grandmaster Oleksandr Sulypa posted a photo of himself holding a gun earlier this year as Russian troops invaded the country, the 50-year-old instantly became a symbol of resistance across the world. Her resilience has been praised on various social media platforms. After serving at a military base in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv, Oleksandr will once again be in the thick of the action on the chessboard as captain-coach of the open team of Ukraine at the next Olympiad from July 28. .
“Putting this photo on social media was my way of announcing that I will do anything for my country. I learned shooting in school when I was a kid. However, my job was to stop and to search passing vehicles and we were not involved in any combat. Our role was to spot spies,” Oleksandr told TOI. Players such as Kirill Shevchenko – who are part of the Olympiad team — had to hide in the subway with thousands of people before leaving the capital. The team will meet in Warsaw, Poland, before departing for India ahead of the tournament.
Oleksandr, who has participated in many Olympiads in the past as a player and as a captain, concedes that this edition of the tournament will be the most difficult. “We have a solid team that is capable of playing good chess. The challenge for me is to keep my team mentally tuned because as soon as we check our cell phones — news about Ukraine makes us sad and worried. Keeping my team in a good headspace will be a challenge,” Oleksandr pointed out.
He conceded that there were apprehensions among Ukrainian players about whether or not to participate in the Olympiad. “Some players did not want to participate in the Olympiads. However, I was very clear — being part of this event is important because sport should always act as a unifier,” revealed Oleksandr.
Chess community support: While the Russian general manager Sergei Karjakin — Magnus Carlsen’s 2016 World Championship challenger — openly supported Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine, Oleksandr revealed how many others opposed Vladimir Putin’s decision. “Karjakin expressed his opinion but I think it was crazy. There are a lot of Russian players who supported us. Many chess players from all over the world sent us their best wishes and we are very grateful to them” , did he declare.
The 10th-seeded Ukrainian Open team includes grandmasters Anton Korobov, Kirill Shevchenko, Andrei Volokitin, Onyshchuk Volodymyr and Yuriv Kuzubov. With all of them outside of Ukraine at the moment, online training has become the norm. “The majority of our players are spread across Europe. We try to meet online every day and keep our spirits up. Some of them are currently participating in tournaments and this should give them enough practice before the Olympiad,” said Oleksandr. The women’s team, meanwhile, is ranked second and includes sisters Anna and Mariya Muzychuk, Anna UsheninaYulia Osmak and Nataliya Buksa.
Favorites from USA and India: For Oleksandr, the Indian hosts and the top seeds in the open category — United States — are the teams to beat. “Both are great units. It will be a big demand for other teams because there is a lot of depth in the American and Indian teams,” Oleksandr said.
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Levon Aronian Wins FTX Road To Miami https://echecs-faciles.com/levon-aronian-wins-ftx-road-to-miami/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 21:18:00 +0000 https://echecs-faciles.com/levon-aronian-wins-ftx-road-to-miami/ GM Levon Aronian won the FTX Road to Miami tournament on Sunday after a second convincing win over GM Wei Yi. The Armenian-American grandmaster won both games with the black pieces. Sunday’s game was a must win for Wei, but the Chinese general manager never had any serious chances. As the tournament progressed, Aronian seemed […]]]>

GM Levon Aronian won the FTX Road to Miami tournament on Sunday after a second convincing win over GM Wei Yi. The Armenian-American grandmaster won both games with the black pieces.

Sunday’s game was a must win for Wei, but the Chinese general manager never had any serious chances. As the tournament progressed, Aronian seemed to be playing chess better and better day by day. Interestingly, he only won with the black pieces in both the semi-finals and the finals.

Moving away from the Queen’s Gambit Accepted, Aronian was slightly better throughout the first game (a Nimzo-Indian instead). It should have ended in a draw, but with 16 seconds on the clock (against 37 for Aronian; the games are 15+10), Wei made a fatal mistake:

Already in grave danger, Wei opted for the Modern as Black in the next game, but it didn’t quite work out. In fact, Aronian was winning several times, but the Chinese finally held the draw to keep his hopes alive:

Wei Yi FTX route to Miami
Wei Yi was satisfied with second place. Image: Champions Chess Tour.

The third game was a must-win for the Chinese player, who came up with the whimsical 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g4!?, a move he himself faced with the black pieces two months ago . This led to a fairly playable position, but Aronian simply played better chess:

“He was playing extremely strong and he was close,” Aronian said. “In the time rush he was making mistakes, but without that it could have gone either way, of course.”

Aronian also noted his “steady progress” in this tournament: “I didn’t really deserve to be in the top eight because my play was so bad, but after that I think I pulled myself together.”

“The result was not good today, but I think the games were interesting,” Wei said. “But he played really well, and maybe I didn’t have a chance.”

2022 FXT Road To Miami Results

The fifth event of the Meltwater Champions Chess Tour 2022, the FXT Road To Miami, took place July 10-17, 2022 on chess24. The preliminary phase was a rapid round robin (15 | 10) with 16 players. The top eight players advanced to the knockout stage which consisted of four quick four-game matchdays, which progressed to blitz (5 | 3) and armageddon (white has five minutes; black, four without increment) are only decided if a knockout match was tied. The price was $150,000.


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